As part of its U.S. travels, hitchBOT rode along with two boys who were heading to summer camp. But a week later, the robot was found to have been vandalized. hitchBOT hide caption

itoggle caption hitchBOT

The Two-Way - News Blog

Group Offers To Help Revive HitchBOT That Was Vandalized In Philadelphia

The kid-sized robot was on a journey from Massachusetts to California when it was torn apart. A group of design and technology makers wants to make repairs so the robot can continue on its way.

Thomas Samson/AP

Parallels - World News

Allegations Of Corruption Dog Mexico's First Lady

Angélica Rivera promised she would sell a multimillion-dollar home bought under controversial circumstances. But she has yet to sell the house, and her spending habits have drawn scrutiny as 2 million more Mexicans have fallen into poverty since her husband took office.

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Billionaire businessman Donald Trump has surged to the top of GOP presidential primary polls despite a slew of controversial comments since he launched his campaign in June. Scott Heppell/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Scott Heppell/AP

It's All Politics

Get Ready For The Biggest Week Yet In The GOP Race For President

Presidential hopefuls have been making mad dashes to try and elevate their poll numbers to qualify for Thursday's debate and woo voters who are just tuning in to the contest.

Researcher John Clements in the early 1980s, after he figured out that lungs need surfactants to breathe. David Powers/Courtesy of UCSF hide caption

itoggle caption David Powers/Courtesy of UCSF

Shots - Health News

How A Scientist's Slick Discovery Helped Save Preemies' Lives

In the 1950s, John Clements discovered a slippery lung substance key to breathing — and to the survival of tiny babies. His insight transformed medicine.

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Newly elected mayor Martin O'Malley, left, waves to supporters in Baltimore in November 1999. Gail Burton/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Gail Burton/AP

It's All Politics

Baltimore Launched Martin O'Malley, Then Weighed Him Down

The city was a political launchpad for the presidential candidate, but his "zero tolerance" policing has drawn criticism for affecting the community's relationship with law enforcement.

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