Harambe, a western lowland gorilla, was fatally shot Saturday, May 28, 2016, to protect a 4-year-old boy who had entered its exhibit. Jeff McCurry/Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden/AP hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Animal Rights Group Calls For Federal Fines For Cincinnati Zoo

The complaint comes after the zoo killed a gorilla to protect a child who climbed into its enclosure. The group said the gorilla's enclosure was inadequate.

Members of the U.S. military who were exposed to mustard gas in secret experiments during World War II (from left): Harry Maxson, Louis Bessho, Rollins Edwards, Paul Goldman and Sidney Wolfson. Courtesy of the families hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Missouri Senator To Introduce Bill To Help Veterans Exposed To Mustard Gas

An NPR investigation found the Department of Veterans Affairs routinely denied compensation to veterans used in secret military experiments during World War II. Sen. Claire McCaskill's bill calls for a new policy for processing claims.

A truck displaying a bumper sticker at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge headquarters near Burns, Ore., in January. Armed anti-federalists took over the wildlife refuge in Oregon for 41 days. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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U.S.

Utah Sheriffs Threaten To Arrest Rangers If They Try To Close Public Lands

Local sheriffs will give you an earful about how they believe environmental extremists have taken over federal agencies. But this is more than just a turf battle.

Utah Sheriffs Threaten To Arrest Rangers If They Try To Close Public Lands
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At a 2015 press conference with President Obama in Addis Ababa, Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn asked the foreign press corps to "help our journalists to increase their capacity." Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Parallels - World News

Freed From Prison, Ethiopian Bloggers Still Can't Leave The Country

Just before President Obama's visit to Ethiopia last year, jailed bloggers and journalists were suddenly released from prison — a welcome gesture of openness. But their freedom only goes so far.

Freed From Prison, Ethiopian Bloggers Still Can't Leave The Country
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Immigrants from El Salvador, including one who says she is seven months pregnant, stand next to a U.S. Border Patrol truck after they turned themselves in to border agents on Dec. 7, 2015, near Rio Grande City, Texas. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S.

U.S.-Mexico Border Sees Resurgence Of Central Americans Seeking Asylum

Despite U.S. efforts to staunch the flow, numbers are approaching the crisis of two years ago. U.S. Border Patrol agents say the influx is diverting resources away from catching drug and human traffickers.

U.S.-Mexico Border Sees Resurgence Of Central Americans Seeking Asylum
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Benjamin Epstein, director of the Anti-Defamation League, stands to the right of Martin Luther King Jr. in this photo with Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy and Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson taken on June 22, 1963. Abbie Rowe/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum hide caption

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U.S.

Anti-Defamation League Chief Faces Challenge Trying To Renew Civil Rights Activism

Jewish groups supported the civil rights movement in the 1960s. But for many current civil rights activists, solidarity with Palestinians takes precedence over the old solidarity with American Jews.

Anti-Defamation League Chief Faces Challenge Trying To Renew Civil Rights Activism
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Police officers search for a 7-year-old boy in the mountains of Hokkaido, where he went missing after his parents said they left him alone temporarily as a punishment. The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Search Continues For 7-Year-Old Left In Japanese Forest As Punishment

A boy has been missing in bear-inhabited woods in Hokkaido, Japan, since Saturday. His parents first said he disappeared as they were foraging, but later admitted to leaving him alone intentionally.

Anton Raphael Mengs left some key details out of his Portrait of Mariana de Silva y Sarmiento, duquesa de Huescar, 1775. Courtesy of The Met Breuer Museum hide caption

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Fine Art

You Gonna Finish That? What We Can Learn From Artworks In Progress

Nearly 200 great works of unfinished art are now on display at The Met Breuer Museum in Manhattan. Spanning six centuries, the works offer a glimpse into the creative process — from Titian to Warhol.

You Gonna Finish That? What We Can Learn From Artworks In Progress
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Syria's Mohammed Faris was a national hero after he became the country's first cosmonaut in 1987, traveling on the Soviet Union's Mir Space Station. Now he's a refugee in Istanbul, Turkey. Faris, 65, is shown standing in front of a painting of himself as a cosmonaut. A critic of Syria's President Bashar Assad, he still hopes to return to his homeland. Peter Kenyon/NPR hide caption

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Parallels - World News

Once A National Hero, Syria's Lone Cosmonaut Is Now A Refugee In Turkey

Mohammed Faris traveled on the Soviet space station nearly three decades ago, becoming so famous that Syria's president was jealous of him. Now he's one of the many Syrians who has fled to Turkey.

Once A National Hero, Syria's Lone Cosmonaut Is Now A Refugee In Turkey
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Hidden Brain

Food For Thought: The Subtle Forces That Affect Your Appetite

What do large tables, large breakfasts, and large servers have in common? They all affect how much you eat. This week on Hidden Brain, we look at the hidden forces that drive our diets.

Food For Thought: The Subtle Forces That Affect Your Appetite
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