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Demonstrators hold signs during a rally against the Republican tax plan on Wednesday in Washington, D.C. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

How The House Tax Overhaul Bill Could Hurt Affordable Housing

Builders of affordable housing say the House Republican tax plan has a poison pill inside it that removes a tax incentive crucial for about half of the affordable housing units that get built.

How The House Tax Overhaul Bill Could Hurt Affordable Housing

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The active part of the landfill in Toa Baja is currently a hot, rancid, open dump. Federal regulations require trash piles to be covered daily with earth. But the site's supervisor says that's currently impossible. José Jiménez-Tirado for NPR hide caption

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José Jiménez-Tirado for NPR

After Maria, Puerto Rico Struggles Under The Weight Of Its Own Garbage

Even before Maria hit, most of the island's landfills were filled beyond capacity and nearly half had EPA closure orders. The storm generated millions of cubic yards of waste and debris.

After Maria, Puerto Rico Struggles Under The Weight Of Its Own Garbage

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The death of Penn State student Timothy Piazza in February has sparked investigations into the hazing culture at the university. Chris Koleno/Flickr Creative Commons hide caption

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Chris Koleno/Flickr Creative Commons

Grand Jury Report On Penn State Hazing Finds 'Indignities And Depravities'

The report was triggered by one deadly incident, but members of the grand jury said they felt obligated to report the broader issues they uncovered — including rampant, dangerous misconduct.

At the Casa Histórica de la Música Cayeyana — a non-profit house of music in Cayey — people come together on the weekends to sing, dance, and recite poetry. Ryan Caron King/WNPR hide caption

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Ryan Caron King/WNPR

'Necesitamos La Música': Puerto Ricans Recovering From Maria Embrace The Arts

WNPR News

Many Puerto Ricans are still without electricity and basic services three months after Hurricane Maria. Some are prioritizing song, dance and celebration to feel more at home again.

The Justice Department has charged Zoobia Shahnaz, 27, with bank fraud and money laundering. She allegedly converted money from credit cards into cryptocurrencies including Bitcoin and transferred it abroad in support of ISIS. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Long Island Woman Charged With Using Bitcoin To Launder Money To Support ISIS

Zoobia Shahnaz, 27, allegedly used credit cards to buy more than $60,000 in cryptocurrency that she later transferred abroad. The Justice Department says she intended to join ISIS in Syria.

The bronze statue of Cardinal Moran stands by the entrance of St. Mary's Cathedral, in Sydney, Australia. Nina Dermawan#145440/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Nina Dermawan#145440/Moment Editorial/Getty Images

Catholic Church Singled Out In Australian Sex Abuse Report

A royal commission recommends that the Australian Catholic Church ask the Vatican to lift its celibacy requirement for clergy and require that evidence of abuse revealed in confession be reported.

People are seen walking pass the "You Are Beautiful" sign, an art installation, in the Englewood neighborhood on Chicago's South Side. Nearly half of the people in this African American neighborhood live below the poverty line and many seniors have no idea there are public services that might help them. Kristen Norman/NPR hide caption

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Kristen Norman/NPR

Sometimes It Takes A 'Village' To Help Seniors Stay In Their Homes

Hundreds of "Villages" have been created around the country, as a "grassroots movement on the part of older people who did not want to be patronized, isolated, [or] infantilized."

Sometimes It Takes A 'Village' To Help Seniors Stay In Their Homes

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William Lynn Weaver with his younger brother, Wayne, in Knoxville, Tenn. in 1963. Courtesy of the Weaver family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Weaver family

On Christmas Eve, A Stolen Bicycle And A Lesson In Giving

William Weaver planned to confront the boy who stole his younger brother's bicycle on Christmas Eve. Instead, his parents showed him the power of kindness and what it means to help those in need.

On Christmas Eve, A Stolen Bicycle And A Lesson In Giving

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James Dinklage, a cattle rancher from Nebraska, is one of the plaintiffs in a lawsuit filed Thursday. The suit accuses the USDA of "arbitrary and capricious" behavior in rolling back two Obama-era rules designed to protect small farmers who say they are being exploited by the meatpacking companies they supply. Courtesy Dinklage Family/Organization for Competitive Markets hide caption

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Courtesy Dinklage Family/Organization for Competitive Markets

The USDA Rolled Back Protections For Small Farmers. Now The Farmers Are Suing

At issue is the Trump administration's withdrawal of two Obama-era rules designed to protect small farmers who say they are being exploited by the meatpacking companies they supply.

Firefighters in Santa Barbara County, Calif., on Wednesday. Thursday, a firefighter whose name has not been released was killed while battling the massive Thomas Fire which straddles Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties. Mike Eliason/Santa Barbara County via AP hide caption

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Mike Eliason/Santa Barbara County via AP

Firefighter Dies in California Wildfire, Now The 4th Largest In The State's History

The Thomas Fire has claimed more than 242,000 acres and over 700 homes. Officials say it won't be contained until January.

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Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., and his wife Franni Bryson (L) arrive at the U.S. Capitol Building on December 7, 2017, in Washington, D.C. Franken announced that he will be resigning in the coming weeks after being accused by several women of sexual harassment. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Poll: Americans Overwhelmingly Support 'Zero Tolerance' On Sexual Harassment

Republicans, independents and Democrats alike agree that "a zero-tolerance policy for sexual harassment is essential to bringing about change in our society," according to a new NPR/Ipsos poll.

Poll: Americans Overwhelmingly Support 'Zero Tolerance' On Sexual Harassment

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This photo provided by Charlottesville, Va., authorities shows James Fields Jr., who on Thursday had the most serious charge against him upgraded to first-degree murder in the death of a woman at a Unite the Right rally. AP hide caption

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AP

First-Degree Murder Charge Against Man Who Drove Into Charlottesville Demonstrators

James Fields Jr. of Ohio had been facing a second-degree murder charge until the judge upgraded it at a preliminary hearing Thursday. One protester was killed and dozens were injured.

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai listens during a commission meeting on Thursday in Washington, D.C. The FCC voted 3-2 to undo Obama-era "net neutrality" rules. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

FCC Repeals 'Net Neutrality' Rules For Internet Providers

The agency voted to undo Obama-era regulations that prohibit cable and telecom companies from blocking access to websites and apps or influencing how fast they load.

The Trump administration has proposed a new rule that would give owners of restaurants and other service businesses more control over workers' tips. Francis Dean/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Francis Dean/Corbis via Getty Images

Tug Of War Over Tips Looms As Trump Administration Proposes Rule Change

The Labor Department has proposed a new rule that would give owners of restaurants and other service businesses more control over workers' tips. But critics warn owners would get too much leeway.

Rule Change Could Give Restaurants More Control Over Workers' Tips

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