Students Patrick Rohrer, Sarah Warthen, Alix Piven and Lauren Urane are led by Mercyhurst University Archeologist Andy Hemmings. Their project has picked up where Florida's State Geologist Elias Sellards left off in 1915. Sellards led an excavation of the site where workers digging a drainage canal found fossilized human remains. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Greg Allen/NPR

Science

Can You Dig It? More Evidence Suggests Humans From The Ice Age

Initially dismissed as a hoax a century ago, scientists have found evidence in Florida of humans living 14,000 years ago. If the findings hold up, they will help rewrite the history of early man.

Art Clay, 78, of Chicago takes a run in a light snowfall on Wednesday. Clay is a co-founder of the National Brotherhood of Skiers. Sonya Doctorian for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Sonya Doctorian for NPR

Code Switch

'The Black Summit' Draws African-American Skiers And Boarders To Aspen

Participants in winter sports are predominantly white, but the National Brotherhood of Skiers has been trying to change that for 42 years. More than 50 regional clubs came to this year's gathering.

Park Ranger Mike Evans at the Castillo de San Marcos says the Spanish were roping cattle and pruning their citrus groves in St. Augustine before the British even set sail for Jamestown. Peter Haden/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Peter Haden/NPR

History

Not So Fast, Jamestown: St. Augustine Was Here First WJCT

Jamestown, Va., claims to be "America's First Region," but St. Augustine, Fla., turns 450 this year, making it the U.S.'s oldest continuous European settlement, a title residents are quick to defend.

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WJCT

Jorge Cham is the creator of PHD Comics and received his doctorate in mechanical engineering at Stanford University. PHD (Piled Higher and Deeper) is a comic strip about life (or the lack thereof) in academia. See more of his work at www.phdcomics.com. Jorge Cham/PHD Comics hide caption

itoggle caption Jorge Cham/PHD Comics

NPR Ed

A Glut Of Ph.Ds Means Long Odds Of Getting Jobs

Only 1 in 5 Ph.Ds in science, engineering and health end up with faculty teaching or research positions within five years of completing their degrees. But universities keep churning them out.

When Annie Clark was assaulted in 2007 she said the response from her university was victim blaming: "I talked to one campus employee and she gave me this extended metaphor about how rape was like a football game and I was the quarterback in charge and what would I have done differently in that situation," she says. Courtesy of Radius hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Radius

Movie Interviews

Film About Campus Sexual Assault Tells Survivors: 'You Are Not Alone'

Survivors Annie Clark and Andrea Pino brought a Title IX complaint against the University of North Carolina. "This is not about UNC," Clark says. "We're not doing this to vilify our institution."

Fernandina's Flicker (Colaptes fernandinae), a woodpecker found only in Cuba. Pete Oxford/Minden Pictures/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Pete Oxford/Minden Pictures/Corbis

Science

U.S. Biologists Keen To Explore, Help Protect Cuba's Wild Places

Birders especially know that Cuba harbors hundreds of rarely seen, little-studied species. As the island nation opens to more U.S. visitors, scientists hope "green Cuba" can survive increased tourism.

In recent years, some popular antebellum plantations have started to incorporate displays about slavery. But the Whitney Plantation has designed the visitor's entire experience around that history. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Debbie Elliott/NPR

Around the Nation

New Museum Depicts 'The Life Of A Slave From Cradle To The Tomb'

A New Orleans attorney has turned an antebellum plantation into a new museum. You won't find hoop skirts and mint juleps, but stark relics at a site devoted entirely to a realistic look at slavery.

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