Scott Simon Scott Simon is a Peabody Award-winning correspondent and host of NPR's Weekend Edition Saturday.
Scott Simon
Will O'Leary/N/A

Scott Simon

Host, Weekend Edition Saturday

Scott Simon is one of America's most admired writers and broadcasters. He has reported from all fifty states, five continents, and ten wars, from El Salvador to Sarajevo to Afghanistan and Iraq. His books have chronicled character and characters, in war and peace, sports and art, tragedy and comedy.

Simon's weekly show, Weekend Edition Saturday, has been called by the Washington Post, "the most literate, witty, moving, and just plain interesting news show on any dial," and by Brett Martin of Time-Out New York "the most eclectic, intelligent two hours of broadcasting on the airwaves." He has won every major award in broadcasting, including the Peabody, the Emmy, the Columbia-DuPont, the Ohio State Award, the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award, and the Sidney Hillman Award. Simon received the Presidential End Hunger Award for his coverage of the Ethiopian civil war and famine, and a special citation from the Peabody Awards for his weekly essays, which were cited as "consistently thoughtful, graceful, and challenging." He has also received the Barry M. Goldwater Award from the Human Rights Fund. Recently, he was awarded the Studs Terkel Award.

Simon has hosted many television specials, including the PBS's "State of Mind," "Voices of Vision," and "Need to Know." "The Paterson Project" won a national Emmy, as did his two-hour special from the Rio earth summit meeting. He co-anchored PBS's "Millennium 2000" coverage in concert with the BBC, and has co-hosted the televised Columbia-DuPont Awards. He also became familiar to viewers in Great Britain as host of the continuing BBC series, "Eyewitness," and a special on the White House press corps. He has appeared as a guest and commentator on all major networks, including BBC, NBC, CNN, and ESPN.

Simon has contributed articles to The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The New York Times Book Review, The Wall Street Journal, The Sunday Times of London, The Guardian, and Gourmet among other publications, and won a James Beard Award for his story, "Conflict Cuisine" in Gourmet. He has received numerous honorary degrees.

Sports Illustrated called his book Home and Away: Memoir of a Fan "extraordinary...uniformly superb...a memoir of such breadth and reach that it compares favorably with Fredrick Exley's A Fan's Notes." It was at the top of several non-fiction bestseller lists. His book, and Jackie Robinson and the Integration of Baseball, was Barnes and Nobles' Sports Book of the Year. His novel, Pretty Birds, the story of two teenage girls in Sarajevo during the siege, received rave reviews, Scott Turow calling it, "the most auspicious fiction debut by a journalist of note since Tom Wolfe's. . . always gripping, always tender, and often painfully funny. It is a marvel of technical finesse, close observation, and a perfectly pitched heart." Windy City, Simon's second novel, is a political comedy set in the Chicago City Council. Baby, We Were Meant for Each Other, an essay about the joys of adoption, was published in August 2010.

Simon's tweets to his 1.25 million Twitter followers from his mother's bedside in the summer of 2013 gathered major media attention around the world. He is completing a book on their last week together that will appear in time for Mother's Day 2015.

Simon is a native of Chicago and the son of comedian Ernie Simon and Patricia Lyons Simon. His hobbies are books, theater, ballet, British comedy, Mexican cooking and "bleeding for the Chicago Cubs." He appeared as Mother Ginger in the Ballet Austin production of The Nutcracker.

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Story Archive

Minnesota's Farmer Crisis Line

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Martin Poole

Paul Hollywood Recounts His 'Baker's Life,' From Ginger Biscuits To Fancy Cakes

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Former President Barack Obama extends his hand as he attends Cook County jury duty at the Daley Center on Wednesday in Chicago. Joshua Lott/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Lott/Getty Images

Even (Former) Presidents Have To Go To Jury Duty

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A supermoon appears above Antwerp, Belgium, on Sept. 28, 2015. Andy Weir's second novel takes place on the first human colony on the moon. Virginia Mayo/AP hide caption

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Virginia Mayo/AP

In New Novel, 'Martian' Author Andy Weir Builds A Colony On The Moon

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Clifton Fadiman looks over a shipment of wine in 1984. His daughter, Anne Fadiman, says she was never able to appreciate wine the way her father did. Courtesy of Annalee Fadiman hide caption

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Courtesy of Annalee Fadiman

A 'Wine Lover's Daughter' Savors Her Dad's Vintage Story

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Flowers are placed on a bike at a memorial on Thursday at the scene of Tuesday's terrorist attack along a bike path in Lower Manhattan. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

After An Attack, New Yorkers' Brave Act: Keep Going

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The Apollo 11 space module floating above the moon. Next-generation space queries may tend toward the political: Do the extraterrestrial beings have political action committees? Are there extraterrestrial lobbyists? Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Getty Images

Close Encounters With Congress?

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Josh Brolin stars as Eric Marsh, supervisor of a wilderness firefighting team, in the new film Only The Brave. Richard Foreman/Courtesy of Sony Pictures hide caption

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Richard Foreman/Courtesy of Sony Pictures

In 'Only The Brave,' The True Story Of Fated Wildland Firefighters

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Author Philip Pullman — pictured at the Bodleian Libraries in Oxford, England — is resurrecting his famed fantasy world for a new trilogy. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images

Philip Pullman Returns To The Dark Materials Universe In A New Prequel — Er, 'Equel'

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Portrait of American social worker Jane Addams (1860 - 1935), early 1900s. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images) Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

When A Name Doesn't Quite Fit

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Travis Meadows' new album, First Cigarette, is available Oct. 13. Joshua Black Wilkins/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Joshua Black Wilkins/Courtesy of the artist

'I Take The Long Way Going Everywhere': Travis Meadows On Learning To Be Human Again

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Crosses honor those killed during the recent mass shooting in Las Vegas. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

We Remember The Wrong Names After Tragedies. Who's To Blame?

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Charity Tillemann-Dick is an opera singer who, in 2009, received a double lung transplant. She tells this story in her new memoir, The Encore. John Armato/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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John Armato/Courtesy of the artist

Singing With New Lungs In 'The Encore'

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