Fresh Air Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.
Fresh Air

Fresh Air

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Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.More from Fresh Air »

Most Recent Episodes

Best Of: Creator Of 'The Crown' / Little Rock Nine Member

The Netflix series 'The Crown,' now in its second season, centers on a young Queen Elizabeth II and the royal family. Creator Peter Morgan talks about how he works with a team of researchers to reconstruct history, and how he takes creative liberties. Also, TV critic David Bianculli discusses the comeback of the anthology series. Finally, we speak with Melba Pattillo Beals. In 1957 she was part of the "Little Rock Nine," a group students chosen by the NAACP to integrate a high school after the Supreme Court declared school segregation unconstitutional. She shares her experience being tormented and bullied by white students. Her new book is 'I Will Not Fear.'

Best Of: Creator Of 'The Crown' / Little Rock Nine Member

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Remembering Radio's Joe Frank / Leaking The Pentagon Papers

Frank, who died this week, created the radio drama series 'Work in Progress' and was known for his intimate on-air monologues, sketches, and interviews. He spoke with Terry Gross in 1989. Also, we talk with Daniel Ellsberg. He leaked the Pentagon Papers to the press in 1971, in hopes they would help end the Vietnam War. He is portrayed in the new film 'The Post.' Film critic David Edelstein reviews the documentary 'The Final Year,' which follows President Obama's foreign policy team as the presidency comes to an end.

Remembering Radio's Joe Frank / Leaking The Pentagon Papers

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Former Neo-Nazi Now Helps Others Leave Hate Behind

Christian Picciolini spent eight years as a member of a violent, white power skinhead group. He eventually withdrew and co-founded a nonprofit to help extremists disengage. His new book is 'White American Youth.'

Former Neo-Nazi Now Helps Others Leave Hate Behind

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How Implanted Medical Devices Create 'A Danger Within Us'

Medical journalist Jeanne Lenzer warns that implanted medical devices are approved with far less scrutiny and testing than pharmaceutical drugs. As a result, she says, some have caused harm and even death. "Walmart tracks heads of lettuce they have on a shelf at any given time. They know how many they have to replace. They can track those a lot better than we're tracking medical devices implanted in people," Lenzer says. Her new book is 'The Danger Within Us.' Also, TV critic David Bianculli discusses the comeback of the anthology series.

How Implanted Medical Devices Create 'A Danger Within Us'

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'The Crown' Creator Peter Morgan

The Netflix series, now in its second season, centers on a young Queen Elizabeth II and the royal family. One of the figures in the series is Elizabeth's uncle, the former King Edward VIII, who abdicated the throne in 1936 and was ostracized by the family. "What we have here is a fantastic family saga," Morgan says. "And no family is complete without an embarrassing uncle, and [Edward] is the ultimate embarrassing uncle." Morgan also wrote the screenplays for the films 'Frost/Nixon' and 'The Queen.' Also, John Powers reviews the second installment of 'American Crime Story' with 'The Assassination of Gianni Versace.'

'The Crown' Creator Peter Morgan

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Little Rock Nine Member Melba Pattillo Beals

In 1957, three years after the Supreme Court declared segregated schools unconstitutional, nine black students were chosen by the NAACP to try to integrate Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. The students were met by an angry white mob, and it took the presence of federal troops to get them into class. One of the students was Melba Pattillo Beals. She's written a new book called 'I Will Not Fear,' about her childhood. Also, film critic David Edelstein reviews 'In The Fade.'

Little Rock Nine Member Melba Pattillo Beals

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Best Of: Lena Waithe / The Making Of Pixar's 'Coco'

Actress and writer Lena Waithe made history as the first black woman to win an Emmy for outstanding comedy writing, for her work on Aziz Ansari's Netflix series 'Master of None.' Now she's lending her voice to a new Showtime series, 'The Chi,' set in the South Side Chicago. Also, John Powers reviews 'The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,' a Golden Globe award-winning series on Amazon. Co-directors and co-writers Lee Unkrich and Adrian Molina spent six years creating their Pixar film 'Coco,' about the Day of the Dead, the Mexican holiday on which the living remember their deceased loved ones.

Best Of: Lena Waithe / The Making Of Pixar's 'Coco'

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Comic Pete Holmes On 'Crashing'

Holmes' HBO show 'Crashing' is based on his real life, after his wife left him and he struggled to find his voice onstage. He grew up a devout Christian and says he saw himself as a "Good Boy" comic, not cursing or talking about sex in the early years of his career. "I was basically picturing [Jesus] in the back of the club." Holmes spoke with Terry Gross in 2017. 'Crashing' is back for a second season. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new David Letterman Netflix series 'My Next Guest Needs No Introduction.'

Comic Pete Holmes On 'Crashing'

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Lena Waithe On 'Master Of None' & 'The Chi'

Waithe made history as the first black woman to win an Emmy for outstanding comedy writing, for her work on Aziz Ansari's Netflix series 'Master of None.' Now she's lending her voice to a new Showtime series, 'The Chi,' set in the South Side Chicago.

Lena Waithe On 'Master Of None' & 'The Chi'

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The Making Of Pixar's 'Coco'

Lee Unkrich and Adrian Molina spent six years creating their animated film about the Day of the Dead, the Mexican holiday on which the living remember their deceased loved ones. The movie is about how the dead remain alive in our hearts as long as we keep them in our memories and tell their stories. 'Coco' just won the Golden Globe for Best Animated Film. Also, classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz reviews a collection of live recordings from soprano Maria Callas.

The Making Of Pixar's 'Coco'

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