Mountain Lions Terrified By Voices Of Rush Limbaugh, Rachel Maddow

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An international team of scientists believes it has solved the mystery of how eggs got their shapes. Frans Lanting/Mint Images RM/Getty Images hide caption

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Frans Lanting/Mint Images RM/Getty Images

How Do Eggs Get Their Shapes? Scientists Think They've Cracked It

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Deilephila elpenor, commonly called the elephant hawk-moth, has specialized eyes that don't reflect light. Such moths inspired scientists to invent an anti-glare coating for smart screens. Ullstein Bild/Getty Images hide caption

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Ullstein Bild/Getty Images

Dead Canary Islands date palms, killed by red palm weevils, line a road in La Mersa, Tunis, Tunisia. Courtesy of Mark Hoddle/Department of Entomology, University of California Riverside hide caption

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Courtesy of Mark Hoddle/Department of Entomology, University of California Riverside
Matt Twombly for NPR

Spillover Beasts: Which Animals Pose The Biggest Viral Risk?

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Sonia Vallabh lost her mother to a rare brain disease in 2010, and then learned she had inherited the same genetic mutation. She and her husband, Eric Minikel, went back to school to study the family of illnesses — prion diseases — in the hope of finding a cure for Sonia. Kayana Szymczak for NPR hide caption

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Kayana Szymczak for NPR

A Couple's Quest To Stop A Rare Disease Before It Takes One Of Them

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The Wyoming toad population in 1985 totaled 16. Today, there are 1,500 and it remains as one of 12 endangered species in the state. Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Radio hide caption

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Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Radio

Wyoming Toads Begin To Recover As States Seek Endangered Species Act Overhaul

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Go To New York City For The Whales

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An OB-GYN Takes A New Patient: Kira The Gorilla

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Donkeys with "kill tags," wait in export pens in Eagle Pass, Texas, destined for slaughterhouses in Mexico. Chinese are buying up donkey skins around the world to use in making traditional medicine. Julie Caramonte/Equine Welfare Alliance and Wild Horse Freedom Foundation hide caption

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Julie Caramonte/Equine Welfare Alliance and Wild Horse Freedom Foundation

Amid Growing Threats, Donkey Rescuers Protect The Misunderstood Beasts Of Burden

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A sometimes lethal strain of H7N9 bird flu that has infected about 1,500 people in China doesn't spread easily among humans — yet. But research published Thursday suggests just a few genetic mutations might be enough to make it quite contagious. Pasieka/Science Source hide caption

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Pasieka/Science Source

A Few Genetic Tweaks To Chinese Bird Flu Virus Could Fuel A Human Pandemic

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Blue North is a new fishing vessel designed to catch Pacific cod using a Seafood Watch granted catch method. It also utilizes a stun table to render fish unconscious before processing. Courtesy of Blue North hide caption

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Courtesy of Blue North

Customers shop at the Al Meera market in Doha, Qatar, on Saturday. Qatar faces possible food and dairy shortages after its Gulf Arab neighbors cut ties with the wealthy nation. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Older adults who own dogs walk more than those who don't own dogs, and that they're moving at a good clip, a study finds. fotografixx/Getty Images hide caption

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fotografixx/Getty Images

Dog Owners Walk 22 Minutes More Per Day. And Yes, It Counts As Exercise

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Boys swim in the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool in 1926 despite the fact that it was forbidden. Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images

An eagle family has adopted a baby red-tailed hawk in British Columbia, but scientists are not sure how much longer these natural enemies can live in harmony. Lynda Robson/Hancock Wildlife Foundation hide caption

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Lynda Robson/Hancock Wildlife Foundation

Researcher Alexandra Horowitz plays with her dogs Finnegan and Upton. She studies how dog's sense of smell influences their view of the world. Vegar Abelsnes/ Courtesy of Alexandra Horowitz hide caption

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Vegar Abelsnes/ Courtesy of Alexandra Horowitz