Code Switch Race and identity, remixed.

After the election, professional peacemakers may feel they have to work harder to tamp down heightened feelings of "us versus them" in the workplace. Marcus Butt/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Marcus Butt/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Tonya Stands recovers from being pepper sprayed by police after swimming across a creek with other protesters hoping to block construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, near Cannon Ball, N.D., on November 2. John L. Mone/AP hide caption

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John L. Mone/AP

A suggestion on the podcast that people of color should win over the hearts and minds of white folks prompted pushback from listeners and a question: who, if anyone, might even be willing to do this? Bjorn Rune Lie/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Bjorn Rune Lie/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Who Should Do The Hard Work Of Being The Race Ambassador?

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New York police officers block the street during a protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in front of Trump Tower on Nov. 12, 2016 in New York. Americans spilled into the streets Saturday for a new day of protests against Trump, even as he appeared to back away from the fiery rhetoric that propelled him to the White House. Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images

Post-Election, Conversations About Race 'Sparked A New Sense Of Urgency'

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Younger and older generations at the St. Thomas Syro-Malabar Church in the Bronx grapple with how much of their faith and culture to retain, honor and leave behind. Teresa Mathew hide caption

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Teresa Mathew

After many elections in which Latino voters had been important but not decisive, Latino leaders had hoped they would finally be able to say that they had delivered the presidency — in this case, to Hillary Clinton. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Teary-eyed Rebecca Canalija, 57, waits for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to address the crowd in New York City on Tuesday. Canalija called Donald Trump's win "tragic" and said she is feeling depressed over it. Yana Paskova for NPR hide caption

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Yana Paskova for NPR