Code Switch Race and identity, remixed.

A Milwaukee police officer stands before the remains of a bar last summer, after police there faced off with protesters following the police shooting of a black man. For decades, interactions between police and people of color in the Midwestern city have been fraught, and those encounters are the subject of a new lawsuit brought by the ACLU. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP/Getty Images

Nadeem Mazen instructs students at a former community space he ran. Samara Vise /Courtesy of JetPac, Inc. hide caption

toggle caption
Samara Vise /Courtesy of JetPac, Inc.

Students stroll around the campus of Spelman College, a historically black college in Atlanta. Chris Shinn/Courtesy of Spelman College hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Shinn/Courtesy of Spelman College

Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences President Cheryl Boone Isaacs speaks onstage during the 88th Annual Academy Awards at the Dolby Theatre on February 28, 2016 in Hollywood, California. Kevin Winter/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Winter/Getty Images

In the first of three conversations about President Barack Obama's racial legacy, Code Switch asks how much was race or racism drove the way the first black president was treated and how he governed. Richie Pope for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Richie Pope for NPR

Obama's Legacy: Diss-ent or Diss-respect?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516818239/516818379" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

We continue conversations on President Barack Obama's racial legacy--this time, we hear opinions on where he fell short or failed people of color. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Chelsea Beck/NPR

Obama's Legacy: Callouts and Fallouts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516821970/516822082" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

It's likely that Barack Obama will be known not only as the first black president, but also as the first president of everybody's race. Many Americans and people beyond the U.S. borders have projected their multicultural selves onto the president. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Chelsea Beck/NPR

Listen

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516823013/516823106" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

This week, Code Switch listeners share their concerns and frustrations for the first hundred days of the new presidential administration. Andrew Biraj/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Biraj/AFP/Getty Images

So, What Are You Afraid of Now?

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516823876/516823953" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Protesters demonstrate as Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi lead members of Congress during a protest on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Encore Plus: Who Is A Good Immigrant, Anyway?

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516824136/516824164" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Directors of the films "I am Not Your Negro," "Life, Animated," "13th," and "OJ: Made In America" are all up for Academy Awards in the Best Documentary Feature category. They are also all filmmakers of color. For the first time, African-American documentarians made up most of the nominees. Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures, A&E IndieFilms, Netflix, and ESPN Films hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures, A&E IndieFilms, Netflix, and ESPN Films

Oscars So Black...At Least, In Documentaries

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516824474/516824523" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Authors Angela Flournoy and Alexander Chee. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Chelsea Beck/NPR

Ten Thousand Writers... and Two Intrepid Podcast Hosts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516825518/516825580" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Writer, director, producer Jordan Peele directs a scene on the set of his new horror movie, Get Out. Justin Lubin/Universal Pictures hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Lubin/Universal Pictures

The Horror, The Horror: "Get Out" And The Place of Race in Scary Movies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516826160/516826181" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">