Code Switch Race and identity, remixed.

Comedian Chris Rock hosting the Oscars on Sunday. Rock's razor-sharp monologue skewered sensibilities on all sides of the #OscarsSoWhite debate. Christopher Polk/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Polk/Getty Images

For Better Or Worse, Chris Rock Made The Oscars As Black As He Possibly Could

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Seu Jorge Frazer Harrison/Getty Images hide caption

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Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Brazilian Singer Seu Jorge: On Music, Race, And Luck Versus Hard Work

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Jack Gibson is one of several disc jockeys and other stars of early black radio who is featured in the Google Cultural Archive. Indiana University's Archives of African American Music and Culture hide caption

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Indiana University's Archives of African American Music and Culture

Archive Spotlights The "Golden Age" Of Black Radio

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Hollywood's Dolby Theater will be a lot fuller Sunday night than this random theater we found on Flickr. But Spike Lee and Ava DuVernay have other things to do that night — and now, so can you! Kevin Jaako/Flickr Creative Commons hide caption

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Kevin Jaako/Flickr Creative Commons

Muhammad Ali, world heavyweight boxing champion, stands with Malcolm X (left) outside the Trans-Lux Newsreel Theater in New York in 1964. AP hide caption

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AP

Muhammad Ali And Malcolm X: A Broken Friendship, An Enduring Legacy

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The website that offers a satirical "solution" for the lack of workplace diversity. Courtesy of Rentaminority.com hide caption

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Courtesy of Rentaminority.com

'Rent-A-Minority' Promises A Satirical Solution To Diversity Problems

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A Japanese woman in the door of her living quarters in San Bruno, Calif. Dorothea Lange/Courtesy of the Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley hide caption

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Dorothea Lange/Courtesy of the Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley

Photos: 3 Very Different Views Of Japanese Internment

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As members of the local Muslim community, Summer Hamad and her daughter Marjan Hamad were personally affected by the murder of three young Muslim-Americans in Chapel Hill, N.C., on Feb. 10, 2015. After the shootings, they both decided to begin wearing the hijab. Reema Khrais hide caption

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Reema Khrais

Shaken By Shooting, North Carolina Muslims Emerge 'Proud' One Year Later

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