Code Switch Race and identity, remixed.

Catholic Charities Brooklyn and Queens holds classes for people who are learning English as a second language. A teacher leads the class in a rendition of Eric Clapton's "Wonderful Night." Alexandra Starr/NPR hide caption

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Alexandra Starr/NPR

In New York's Multinational Astoria, Diversity Is Key To Harmony

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Russell Moore preaching during the first plenary address, "Black, And White And Red All Over: Why Racial Reconciliation Is A Gospel Issue." Alli Rader hide caption

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Alli Rader

Southern Baptists Don't Shy Away From Talking About Their Racist Past

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The gesture Kimmy's making doesn't mean the same thing to Dong. Eric Liebowitz/Netflix hide caption

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Eric Liebowitz/Netflix

Why It's So Hard For Us To Agree About Dong From 'Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt'

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Two years ago, Charles Ramsey, Philadelphia's police commissioner, called for a federal review of the city's police practices. Ramsey called for a similar federal inquiry during his tenure as police chief in Washington, D.C. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

File photo of the Oakland Police Department as they salute at the public memorial service for slain Oakland police officers. Michael Macor-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Macor-Pool/Getty Images

Retired Oakland Police Officer Recruits Locals To Police Their Own City

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Lacey Schwartz grew up believing she was the daughter of white, Jewish parents. It wasn't until a university labeled her as black that she decided to explore the doubts she's always had about her race. Courtesy of Independent Lens hide caption

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Courtesy of Independent Lens

Family Secret And Cultural Identity Revealed In 'Little White Lie'

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Ms. Payne interviewing a soldier from Chesapeake, Va., in Vietnam in 1967. Courtesy of the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center/Harper Collins hide caption

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Courtesy of the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center/Harper Collins

From Selma To Eisenhower, Trailblazing Black Reporter Was Always Probing

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Demonstrators of different races and religions from across the country united to take part in the historic march from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., 50 years ago. AP hide caption

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AP

'A Proud Walk': 3 Voices On The March From Selma To Montgomery

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