Code Switch Race and identity, remixed.
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The Code Switch Podcast, Episode 1: Can We Talk About Whiteness?

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The Hokule'a, a voyaging canoe built to revive the centuries-old tradition of Polynesian exploration, makes its way up the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. Sailed by a crew of 12 who use only celestial navigation and observation of nature, the canoe is two-thirds of the way through a four-year trip around the world. Bryson Hoe/Courtesy of 'Oiwi TV and Polynesian Voyaging Society hide caption

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Bryson Hoe/Courtesy of 'Oiwi TV and Polynesian Voyaging Society

Hokule'a, The Hawaiian Canoe Traveling The World By A Map Of The Stars

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Angie Wang for NPR

My 'Oriental' Father: On The Words We Use To Describe Ourselves

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Emily Bogle/NPR

Filipino Americans: Blending Cultures, Redefining Race

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Mendez stands in his bedroom recording studio. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Emily Bogle/NPR

How The Narrator Of 'Jane The Virgin' Found His Voice

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First Lady Michelle Obama wears her signature cardigan while dancing with performers from the television show So You Can Dance during the annual White House Easter Egg Roll on April 6, 2015. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Mrs. Obama Saves The Cardigan: 'The Obama Effect' In Fashion

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Supporters of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump shout at the media prior to a rally at the Charleston Civic Center on May 5 in Charleston, W.Va. Mark Lyons/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Lyons/Getty Images

It's Gotten A Lot Harder To Act Like Whiteness Doesn't Shape Our Politics

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Standing (from left): Reporter Karen Grigsby Bates, editor Tasneem Raja, news assistant Leah Donnella, producer Walter Ray Watson, editor Alicia Montgomery. Seated (from left): Reporters and hosts Gene Demby and Shereen Marisol Meraji, reporters Kat Chow and Adrian Florido Matt Roth/NPR hide caption

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Matt Roth/NPR

A preview of the Code Switch podcast!

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The University of Louisville's marching band leaves the Churchill Downs infield after performing the state song at the Kentucky Derby. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Churchill Downer: The Forgotten Racial History Of Kentucky's State Song

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A reconstruction of Kennewick Man sculpted to resemble the Ainu people of Japan, considered by some at the time to be his closest living relatives. Now, a link to Native Americans has been confirmed. Brittney Tatchell/Smithsonian Institute hide caption

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Brittney Tatchell/Smithsonian Institute

The sign, a private marker placed by the NAACP, and approved by the National Park Service, as it now stands in Army Park. Christopher Blank/WKNO-FM hide caption

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Christopher Blank/WKNO-FM

Do The Words 'Race Riot' Belong On A Historic Marker In Memphis?

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