Code Switch Race and identity, remixed.

Kids Touching, 1940s. Joe Schwartz/Courtesy of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture hide caption

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Joe Schwartz/Courtesy of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

'Picturing Children' Shows More Than A Century Of African-American Childhoods

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Author Walter Mosley with his father, Leroy Mosley. Courtesy of Walter Mosley hide caption

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Courtesy of Walter Mosley

'Easy' Writer: Walter Mosley's Passion For Bringing Black LA Stories To Life

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A police officer patrols during a protest in support of the Black Lives Matter movement in New York City on July 9. Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Letter From Young Asian-Americans To Their Families About Black Lives Matter

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Delrawn Small's companion Zaquanna Albert, left, and his brother Victor Demsey, center, and Cynthia Howell, right, an advocate with Families United for Justice, an organization made up of families affected by police killings, attend a news conference Thursday July 14, 2016 in New York. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

Who Is Delrawn Small? Why Some Police Shootings Get Little Media Attention

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Leslie Jones poses backstage during the Sony Pictures Entertainment presentation at CinemaCon 2016, the official convention of the National Association of Theatre Owners, at Caesars Palace on April 12, 2016, in Las Vegas. Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

In a recent interview, Hillary Clinton said she would "call for white people, like myself, to put ourselves in the shoes of those African-American families" — unusually direct language about white people from a major political figure. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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'I'm Petrified For My Children': Will Racism And Guns Lead To America's Ruin?

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Reince Priebus, chairman of the Republican National Committee, speaks to the delegates on start of the first day of the Republican National Convention. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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A car with "#Justice4Philando" written on it is parked outside the funeral of Philando Castile at the Cathedral of St. Paul. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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46 Stops: On 'The Driving Life And Death Of Philando Castile'

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Dr. Brian Williams, a trauma surgeon at Parkland Memorial Hospital, poses for a photo at the hospital, Monday, July 11, 2016, in Dallas. Williams treated some of the Dallas police officers who were shot Thursday night in downtown Dallas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay) Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Treating The Police, Fearing The Police: Dallas Surgeon Brian Williams Reflects

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Dallas Police Chief David Brown (second from left) and Dallas Area Rapid Transit Police Chief James Spiller (second from right) attend an interfaith memorial service for the victims of the Dallas police shooting. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Code Switch Podcast, Episode 8: Black And Blue

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Elie Wiesel speaks at Vermont's Middlebury College in 2002. The Holocaust survivor, Nobel laureate and author died July 2 at the age of 87. Jordan Silverman/Getty Images hide caption

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