Code Switch Race and identity, remixed.

While the number of Asian-American lawyers and law students increased greatly in recent decades, there are still few Asian-American lawyers in top positions in the legal field. Tawatdchai Muelae/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
Tawatdchai Muelae/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Hip Hop deejays Stretch Armstrong (right) aka Adrian Bartos and Bobbito (left) aka Robert Garcia became legends on The Stretch Armstrong Show during the 1990s. Back then, they were hip hop tastemakers on college station WKCR in New York City. Now they're back together hosting "What's Good? With Stretch and Bobbito," an NPR podcast. Nickolai Hammar/NPR/. hide caption

toggle caption
Nickolai Hammar/NPR/.

Stretch & Bobbito On Race, Hip-Hop, And Belonging

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/539368829/539470597" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Canvasser Ana Mejia gathers her supplies at the offices of the National Council of La Raza in Miami in 2016. The NCLR renamed itself UnidosUS this month, causing a rift in the U.S. Latino community. Some see it as shedding a dated name, but others see it as leaving a legacy behind. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Wilfredo Lee/AP

The Largest U.S. Latino Advocacy Group Changes Its Name, Sparking Debate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/538381366/538608506" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bao Phi hopes his poetry book Thousand Star Hotel and his children's book A Different Pond can fill the hole in Asian-American literature that he saw when he was a kid. Anna Min/Courtesy of Capstone Publishing hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Min/Courtesy of Capstone Publishing

The Poet Bao Phi, On Creating A 'Guidebook' For Young Asian-Americans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537580283/541197587" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chairman and CEO Linda Johnson Rice speaks at Ebony magazine's Power 100 Gala at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, Calif., last December. Earl Gibson III/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Earl Gibson III/Getty Images

#EbonyOwes: 99 Problems And Money Is One

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537060492/537770535" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

"For nearly half a century, I've tracked Hollywood's Arabs and Muslims. Almost always I found that they've appeared as villains," Jack Shaheen said in a talk at the National Press Club in March 2017. Washington Report on Middle East Affairs/YouTube hide caption

toggle caption
Washington Report on Middle East Affairs/YouTube

Octavia Butler at home. A lifelong bibliophile, she considered libraries sacred spaces. (c) Patti Perret/The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens hide caption

toggle caption
(c) Patti Perret/The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

Octavia Butler: Writing Herself Into The Story

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/535879364/536392915" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Slants' frontman, Simon Tam, filed the original lawsuit after the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office kept the band from registering its name. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ariel Zambelich/NPR

What's Next For The Founder Of The Slants, And The Fight Over Racial Slurs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/535055061/535794027" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Code Switch podcast is celebrating its first anniversary. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Chelsea Beck/NPR

From Mourning to 'Moonlight': A Year In Race, As Told By Code Switch

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/533819668/534878726" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Elvis Presley, in the studio in 1956 — Presley's success was undoubtedly driven by the material he appropriated from black musicians. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bettmann Archive/Getty Images