Code Switch Race and identity, remixed.

Graphic Novel Depicts John Lewis' 'March' Toward Justice

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A white heckler arrested during an anti-segregation demonstration in Lexington, Ky., is hustled into a police car in August 1963. Forty years later, the Lexington Herald-Leader ran a correction apologizing for the newspaper's lack of coverage of the civil rights movement. AP hide caption

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AP

More than 200,000 gather on the Washington Monument grounds before marching to the Lincoln Memorial on Aug. 28, 1963. AP hide caption

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AP

One Historic March, Countless Striking Moments

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George Whitmore Jr., a 19-year-old unemployed laborer, is shown in a Brooklyn, N.Y., police station on April 25, 1964, after his arrest in the Career Girl Murders. Jack Kanthal/AP hide caption

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Jack Kanthal/AP

March On Washington, Coinciding Murders Redefined Liberties

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Made from the oil of the Chinese water snake, which is rich in the omega-3 acids that help reduce inflammation, snake oil in its original form was effective, especially when used to treat arthritis and bursitis. Jagrap/Flickr hide caption

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Jagrap/Flickr

Demonstrators on Saturday in Washington, D.C., commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Kevin Lamarque/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Kevin Lamarque/Reuters/Landov

50 Years Later, A March On Washington Among Generations

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Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer of Ruleville, Miss., speaks to the state's Freedom Democratic Party sympathizers outside the Capitol in Washington, D.C., in 1965. William J. Smith/AP hide caption

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William J. Smith/AP

While Unsung in '63, Women Weren't Just 'Background Singers'

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Tony Leung (center) fends off challengers as Wing Chun kung fu master Ip Man in Wong Kar Wai's The Grandmaster. The Weinstein Company hide caption

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The Weinstein Company

Renowned Kung Fu Master Inspires Slew Of Action Flicks

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