Code Switch Race and identity, remixed.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's novel Half of a Yellow Sun, one of the films to premiere in Toronto this year, is part of a new wave of films with roots in Britain about the black experience. TIFF hide caption

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TIFF

British Filmmakers Shift American 'Conversation On Race'

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It's estimated that 4,743 Americans were lynched between 1882 and 1968. A large majority of those victims were black. Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

Students and alumni line up at Howard University in Washington, D.C., before August's commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. Nathaniel Grann/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Nathaniel Grann/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Student Loan Changes Squeeze Historically Black Colleges

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Young people stand in line in Los Angeles to apply for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which allows qualified immigrants who entered the U.S. illegally as children to study or work openly. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

In this 2011 photo, American-born Islamist militant Omar Hammami, right, sits with al-Shabab deputy leader Sheikh Mukhtar Abu Mansur Robow during a press conference in Somalia. Farah Abdi Warsameh/AP hide caption

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Farah Abdi Warsameh/AP

The Last Tweets From An American Jihadist In Somalia

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Craig Cobb's house on Main Street in Leith, N.D., where he spends his days posting online comments advocating for white supremacists to join his settlement. Cobb, a self-described white supremacist, has invited fellow white separatists to help him transform the town into a white enclave. Kevin Cederstrom/AP hide caption

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Kevin Cederstrom/AP

This Tiny Town Is Trying To Stop Neo-Nazis From Taking Over

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