Code Switch Race and identity, remixed.
Daniel Fishel for NPR

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The Wayman Chapel A.M.E. Church in Lyles Station. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

In Indiana, The Last Remnants Of America's Free African-American Settlements

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

Content Notice: Here Are A Few Ways Professors Use Trigger Warnings

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The hulking, shuttered Eastern State Penitentiary, a short walking distance from Philadelphia's downtown, was in many ways the first modern American prison. Almost from its opening in the early 19th century, there were people calling for it, and prisons like it, to be shut down because they felt they were inhumane. Shinya Suzuki/Flickr hide caption

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Shinya Suzuki/Flickr

The words of the late writer James Baldwin narrate the award-winning documentary I Am Not Your Negro. Courtesy of the Toronto International Film Festival hide caption

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Courtesy of the Toronto International Film Festival

Mae Reeves and her husband Joel pose with her hats at Mae's Millinery in Philadelphia, circa 1953. Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift from Mae Reeves and her children, Donna Limerick and William Mincey, Jr. hide caption

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Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift from Mae Reeves and her children, Donna Limerick and William Mincey, Jr.

Mae Reeves' Hats Hang At National Museum Of African American History And Culture

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Susan Glisson, former director of the William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation at the University of Mississippi, facilitates discussions on slavery and race. Charles Tucker/Sustainable Equity hide caption

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Charles Tucker/Sustainable Equity

'Only Cheap Talk Is Cheap': Mississippi Woman Hosts Conversations About Race

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Rapper Tupac Shakur arrives at New York's Radio City Music Hall on Sept. 4, 1996. Todd Plitt/AP hide caption

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Todd Plitt/AP

Episode 17: Why Do We Still Care About Tupac?

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Native American protestors gather at a construction site for the Dakota Access pipeline to perform a daily prayer ceremony. Over 1,000 people, most Native American, have gathered at two prayer camps along the Cannonball River near its confluence with the Missouri in North Dakota to protest the Dakota Access pipeline. Andrew Cullen hide caption

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Andrew Cullen

Film director Ava DuVernay brings her talents to "Queen Sugar," a drama series premiering Tuesday Sept. 6 on Oprah's OWN network. Paul A. Hebert/Paul A. Hebert/Invision/AP hide caption

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Paul A. Hebert/Paul A. Hebert/Invision/AP

Ava Duvernay And 'Queen Sugar': Celebrating Diversity, Inclusivity In TV

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Verona is a one-stop shop for original and stylish conservative wear, filling a long-term void in the fashion industry. Lisa Vogl/Verona Collection hide caption

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Lisa Vogl/Verona Collection

In Orlando, A 'Modest Fashion' Boutique For Hijabi Women

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A woman holds a picture of Mexican songwriter and singer Juan Gabriel near a statue of him during a mass in Mexico City's Garibaldi plaza, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2016. Eduardo Verdugo/AP hide caption

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Eduardo Verdugo/AP

Podcast Extra: Juan Gabriel And The Tricky Conversation About Sexual Identity

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