npr Ed We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

Mentor Antwon Cooper (left) helps student Julius Barne, 15, during a group activity in a history class. Jun Tsuboike/NPR hide caption

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Jun Tsuboike/NPR

For At-Risk Kids, Mentors Provide Far More Than Just Homework Help

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Will STEM Education Be The Child Left Behind?

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A student shows off his lost tooth to his classmates. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Forcing Schools To Hit The 'Reset' Button

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The Elementary and Secondary Education Act hasn't been updated since it was renamed "No Child Left Behind" in 2001 by President George W. Bush. The law was introduced by President Lyndon Johnson in 1965 to help states level the playing field for students living and learning in poverty. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

No Child Left Behind: What Worked, What Didn't

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The Online College That's Helping Undocumented Students

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Deborah Ball introduces a math problem to students at the Mathematics Teaching and Learning to Teach seminar at the University of Michigan. Brian Powers/University of Michigan hide caption

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Brian Powers/University of Michigan

Teaching Teachers To Teach: It's Not So Elementary

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President Barack Obama and Secretary of Education Arne Duncan (left), at North High School in Des Moines this month. The White House and the Department of Education are calling on states to cut the "burden" of unnecessary testing. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

In a lesson on the patterns of immigration, a caption refers to slaves as "workers," prompting mom and educator Roni Dean-Burren to protest the caption on social media. Courtesy of Roni Dean-Burren hide caption

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Courtesy of Roni Dean-Burren
LA Johnson/NPR

A Year Later: The School System That Welcomed Unaccompanied Minors

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Raymond Cabahug moved from the Philippines to teach math in the U.S. He likes life in "peaceful" Bethune, Colo. Jenny Brundin/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Jenny Brundin/Colorado Public Radio

A Tiny School District Reaches Far And Wide For New Teachers

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