npr Ed We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

Education Secretary Arne Duncan (second from left) speaks with inmate Terrell Johnson, a participant in the Goucher College Prison Education Partnership. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

The Plan To Give Pell Grants To Prisoners

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The Play's The Thing — High School Productions Down The Decades

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President Obama is the first sitting president to visit a federal prison. Kevin Lamarque/Landov hide caption

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Kevin Lamarque/Landov

Pell Grants For Prisoners: An Old Argument Revisited

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High school students in the Johns Hopkins University summer program, Engineering Innovation, compete in an annual spaghetti bridge-building competition. Above: The A'hunna Key-Lows push their bridge to the limit. Below: The Key-Lows' winning bridge shatters — but only after holding 53 pounds. Lydia Thompson/NPR hide caption

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Lydia Thompson/NPR

Teaching Students To Use Their Noodles

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Eliot Elementary in St. Louis, Mo., closed 10 years ago. The building remains empty. Tim Lloyd/ St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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Tim Lloyd/ St. Louis Public Radio

The Struggle To Breathe Life Back Into Empty Schools

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Cooper is known as the Swim Whisperer. He's been teaching swimming full-time since 1995. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

The 'Swim Whisperer' Teaches Kids To Be Water-Safe

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The Test That Can Look Into A Child's (Reading) Future

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Sandy Kress (right) an attorney from Dallas, listens to Texas Education Agency general counsel David Anderson in 2004. Kress was the chief education consultant to the Bush administration's No Child Left Behind initiative. Harry Cabluck/AP hide caption

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Harry Cabluck/AP