npr Ed We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.
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Knock Knock, Teacher's Here: The Power Of Home Visits

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Shaun Harper of the University of Pennsylvania is a co-author of the new report. Stuart Goldenberg/University of Pennsylvania hide caption

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Stuart Goldenberg/University of Pennsylvania

Study Tracks Vast Racial Gap In School Discipline In 13 Southern States

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A human skeleton, part of the WM Bass Donated Skeletal Collection. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

If These Bones Could Talk: The Stories Human Skeletons Can Tell

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Students pose for a selfie with John Fallon, the CEO of Pearson in Brownsville, Texas, on May 16. Fallon delivered the commencement address to more than 300 students at Texas Southmost College in Brownsville. Brad Doherty/AP Images for Pearson hide caption

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Brad Doherty/AP Images for Pearson

Kimberly Cervantes, one of the student plaintiffs, says she witnessed the deaths of two fellow students while in middle school. Coutesy of Public Counsel hide caption

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Coutesy of Public Counsel

Are Traumatized Students Disabled? A Debate Straight Outta Compton

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Sleepingspider/Ikon Images/Corbis

To Learn More, This High-Schooler Left The Classroom

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Teacher Shortage? Or Teacher Pipeline Problem?

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Clockwise from top left: Sophia Neciosup, 13, Natalia Cox, 13, Alexis Brooks, 13, and Tehya Ford, 16, all participated in a Black Girls CODE summer camp session in San Francisco. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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LA Johnson/NPR

'Disrupting' Tech's Diversity Problem With A Code Camp For Girls Of Color

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