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Kids And Screen Time: Cutting Through The Static

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Home-schooling might still be seen as a fringe movement, but today, it's equally outlandish to suggest that home-schooling should be illegal. A few decades ago, that wasn't the case. MoMo Productions/Getty Images/Ozy hide caption

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MoMo Productions/Getty Images/Ozy

New York City Schools Chancellor Carmen Farina speaks with students Carlos Cruz and Lluvia Hernandez while visiting a school in Brooklyn earlier this year. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Teachers are incorporating mobile technology and a digital sensibility into classroom lessons with assignments such as this one: to caption a historical photograph for teacher Nicholas Ferroni's high school history class in Union, N.J. Courtesy of Nicholas Ferroni hide caption

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Courtesy of Nicholas Ferroni

Margaret Martin (right) poses with student Jose Correa during a Harmony Project open house at the Ramon C. Cortines School for Visual and Performing Arts in Los Angeles. Esteban Rael/Harmony Project hide caption

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Esteban Rael/Harmony Project

Harmony Project Offers More Than Just Music In LA

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