Coal Towns Face An Uncertain Future. What Is The Country Obliged To Do?

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The Colstrip Generating Station near Colstrip, Mont., is the second-largest coal-fired power plant in the West. Two of its four units are scheduled to close by 2022, if not sooner. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

Town That Helped Power Northwest Feels Left Behind In Shift Away From Coal

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Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval plans to sign a bill will let homeowners with solar panels sell excess electricity to their utility at retail rates, his office says. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Texans React To Trump's Decision To Pull Out Of Paris Climate Accord

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Energy Economist Says Paris Accord Withdraw Doesn't Mean Much For U.S. Energy

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Barbershop: President Trump's Paris Accord Decision And Kathy Griffin

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Rob Bottegal, head engineer of the Acosta Deep Mine for Corsa Coal Corp., overlooks the mine in Jennerstown, Pa., on Feb. 28. Dan Speicher/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review via AP hide caption

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Dan Speicher/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review via AP

FACT CHECK: Is President Trump Correct That Coal Mines Are Opening?

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Police move through the camp of protesters against the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, N.D., in February. Despite months of protests by Native American tribes and environmental groups, crude oil is now flowing through the pipeline. Angus Mordant for NPR hide caption

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Angus Mordant for NPR

Montana Town Exemplifies Coal Country's Uncertain Future

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President Trump had been urged by world leaders, scientists and CEOs to keep the U.S. in the Paris climate accord, but the agreement's critics won out. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Will Trump Pull Out Of The Climate Deal? He Promised His Base He Would

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The Exxon Mobil shareholder vote is seen as a victory for environmental activists and one that is aimed at getting the company to consider "material risk," according to The Dallas Morning News. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

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Mark Humphrey/AP

Pumpjacks in North Dakota's Bakken oil patch extract oil from deep underground. Oil production has grown nationally in recent months to 9.3 million barrels of oil per day. Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Broadcasting

Boom Time Again For U.S. Oil Industry, Thanks To OPEC

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John Goodenough's work led to the lithium-ion battery, now found in everything from phones to electric cars. He and fellow researchers at the University of Texas, Austin say they've come up with a faster-charging alternative. Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT hide caption

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Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT

At 94, Lithium-Ion Pioneer Eyes A New Longer-Lasting Battery

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A flag bearing the company logo of Royal Dutch Shell flies outside the energy giant's head office in The Hague, Netherlands, in 2014. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Energy Companies Urge Trump To Remain In Paris Climate Agreement

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