Chef Michael Scelfo of Cambridge, Mass., left, and Lisa Carlson, who operates three food trucks in Minneapolis, collaborate on the Glynwood dinner's spelt salad with lamb tongues and hearts, and "ugly" cherries, shiitakes, and kale. Lela Nargi/NPR hide caption

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Lela Nargi/NPR

'From The Ashes' Documents Rise And Fall Of Coal In America

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Deilephila elpenor, commonly called the elephant hawk-moth, has specialized eyes that don't reflect light. Such moths inspired scientists to invent an anti-glare coating for smart screens. Ullstein Bild/Getty Images hide caption

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Dead Canary Islands date palms, killed by red palm weevils, line a road in La Mersa, Tunis, Tunisia. Courtesy of Mark Hoddle/Department of Entomology, University of California Riverside hide caption

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Courtesy of Mark Hoddle/Department of Entomology, University of California Riverside

ExxonMobil Uses Carbon Tax Strategy To Its Advantage, Author Says

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Jayme Orrack oversees Xcel Energy's new wind farm in Courtenay, N.D. The wind farm started generating electricity late last year with 100 turbines that collectively generate 200 megawatts of electricity. Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Broadcasting

The Rise Of Wind Energy Raises Questions About Its Reliability

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A wildfire in Portugal has killed at least 64 people since it began on Saturday. Above, a charred forest near Pedrogao Grande on Tuesday. Miguel Riopa/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Conservationists Try To Thwart Climate Change By Planting In Cold Spots

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Cows graze near Murwillumbah, New South Wales, Australia. China has replaced the United States as the second-largest foreign owner of agricultural land in Australia. (The UK is No. 1.) Auscape/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Is China Snatching Up Australian Farmland?

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Coffee is thought to have originated in Ethiopia. Coffea arabica, or coffee Arabica, the species that produces most of the world's coffee, is indigenous to the country. Courtesy of Alan Schaller hide caption

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Courtesy of Alan Schaller

The Wyoming toad population in 1985 totaled 16. Today, there are 1,500 and it remains as one of 12 endangered species in the state. Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Radio hide caption

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Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Radio

Wyoming Toads Begin To Recover As States Seek Endangered Species Act Overhaul

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Go To New York City For The Whales

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Courtesy of Museums Victoria / CSIRO

Explorers Probing Deep Sea Abyss Off Australia's Coast Find Living Wonders

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Twenty percent of baby food samples were found to contain lead, according to a report from the Environmental Defense Fund. The report did not name brand names. Wiktory/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Wiktory/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Native Americans and their supporters protest in March outside of the White House against the construction of the disputed Dakota Access oil pipeline. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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