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Russians Toast The New Year With Elaborate Cocktails, Not Vodka

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By Returning To Farming's Roots, He Found His American Dream

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A '$4 Slushie' Tops Critic's List Of Best Cocktail Of The Year

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Beverly Kurtz and Tim Guenthner live near Gross Reservoir outside Boulder, Colo. They oppose a an expansion project that would raise the reservoir's dam by 131 feet. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio

High Demand, Low Supply: Colorado River Water Crisis Hits Across The West

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Flavor wheels stem from lexicons, the carefully, often scientifically selected words used to describe a product, be it food, wine, carpet cleaner or dog food. Scott Suchman/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Suchman/The Washington Post/Getty Images

African runner peanuts were once a defining flavor of the South, memorialized in songs, peanut fritters, peanut soup and in Charleston's signature candy, the peanut-and-molasses groundnut cake. But by the 1930s the nuts had all but disappeared. Courtesy of Brian Ward hide caption

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Courtesy of Brian Ward

The Gingerbread Demolition lets people destroy gingerbread houses for charity. Kim Lajoie/Courtesy of The Gingerbread Demolition Crew hide caption

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Kim Lajoie/Courtesy of The Gingerbread Demolition Crew

Moe stands behind her tiny bar in Shanghai, where there are only eight seats and reservations are a must. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

In A Massive City, This Bar Serves Up Diverse Drinks — To 8 People At A Time

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Many large-scale farms rely heavily on immigrant labor. And many farmers are opposed to Donald Trump's strong stance against illegal immigrant. Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Fair workers at a vegetarian stand sell meatless items at the "Bio" (organic food) section of the International Green Week Food and Agriculture Fair in Berlin in 2011. Germany's minister of agriculture has called for a ban on using meaty words like "schnitzel" and "würst" to market such products. John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images

Hipsters In Mexico City Revive Ancient Fermented Drink

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The Caribbean Tradition, an appetizer made with pickled pig's feet, chiriqui beans, and puffed pork skin, at Donde Jose. Chef Carles calls it his version of a ceviche. Kait Bolongaro for NPR hide caption

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Kait Bolongaro for NPR

Poet Emily Dickinson Was A Much Loved Baker

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People celebrate New Year's in Madrid's Puerta del Sol square, on Jan. 1, 2011. Traditionally, the drinking doesn't begin until after midnight, when people eat 12 grapes for good luck. Alvaro Hurtado/AP hide caption

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Alvaro Hurtado/AP

In Spain, New Year's Eve Is All About The Grapes — Save The Bubbly For Later

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