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A Bolivian farmer harvests organic quinoa in his fields in Puerto Perez, Bolivia. Some researchers are working with quinoa farmers in Bolivia and Peru to try to develop internal markets for threatened varieties — for example, in hospital and school food programs. Juan Karita/AP hide caption

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Juan Karita/AP

Farmer Aubrey Fletcher of Purdy, Mo., is one of thousands of women who have taken on leadership roles in the traditionally male-dominated agriculture industry. Despite her busy workload, Fletcher has been making the time to meet regularly with a new group of women dairy farmers in her area. Suzanne Hogan for Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Suzanne Hogan for Harvest Public Media

These shrimp "Peking ravioli" (aka dumplings) were featured at the third annual Festival of Dumplings in 2014 — honoring Bostonian and celebrity chef Joyce Chen. Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

The modern broiler, or meat chicken, grows incredibly fast. But some critics say the bird — and the flavor of its meat — may suffer as a result. Whole Foods wants all of its suppliers to shift to slower-growing chicken breeds, like this one, seen at Arkansas-based Crystal Lake Farms. Courtesy of Crystal Lake Farms hide caption

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Courtesy of Crystal Lake Farms

Why Whole Foods Wants A Slower-Growing Chicken

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A beehive at Frangiosa Farms, in Parker, Colo. The farm introduced an adopt-a-hive program in 2012. The one-time adoption fees per hive range from $45 to $130 (the latter gets you three jars of honey). Courtesy of Nick French/Frangiosa Farms hide caption

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Courtesy of Nick French/Frangiosa Farms

This version of Baked Alaska at Delmonico's restaurant in New York City stays true to the original: a walnut sponge cake layered with apricot compote and banana gelato, covered with torched meringue. Courtesy of Delmonico's Restaurant hide caption

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Courtesy of Delmonico's Restaurant

Shoppers sort through yellow plums at the Union Square Park greenmarket in New York City. A study of retailers in Manhattan finds that organic foods are much more common in affluent neighborhoods. Andy Katz/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Katz/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

A batch of sourdough starter can live indefinitely, but it also requires a certain amount of care and feeding. In Sweden, bakers jetting off for vacation can leave their precious starters in the care of a sitter at the airport. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

A mockup of a possible GMO label on a can of Campbell's Spaghetti-Os, with these words: "Partially produced with genetic engineering." Unless Congress or a federal court intervene, Vermont's new GMO labeling law will go into effect in July. So some companies are scrambling to comply. Courtesy of Campbell Soup Company hide caption

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Courtesy of Campbell Soup Company

How Little Vermont Got Big Food Companies To Label GMOs

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Newfoundland Faces Condiment Crisis As Smucker's Scraps Mustard Pickles

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