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Back in 2012, Silver Diner — a fast-casual restaurant chain in Maryland and Virginia — completely overhauled its children's menu. Those changes helped dramatically improve the healthfulness of kids' meals ordered, a new study finds. Ron Cogswell/Flickr hide caption

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Ron Cogswell/Flickr

In the Blue Zone of Okinawa, Japan, locals drink green tea with jasmine flowers and turmeric called shan-pien, which translates to "tea with a bit of scent." David McLain/Courtesy of Blue Zones hide caption

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David McLain/Courtesy of Blue Zones

Tyson Foods says it has already reduced its use of human-use antibiotics by 80 percent over the past four years. Here, Tyson frozen chicken on display at Piazza's market in Palo Alto, Calif., in 2010. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

Tyson Foods To Stop Giving Chickens Antibiotics Used By Humans

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Ran Duan will represent the U.S. at the Bacardi Global Legacy Cocktail Competition in Sydney on April 28. Daniel A. Gross hide caption

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Daniel A. Gross

Competitive Bartender Pours Father's Wisdom Into Signature Drink

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Chipotle's announcement that it has removed all GMOs from its menu items is part of a growing food industry trend. From left: Nestle chocolates, Chipotle tortillas, Diet Pepsi, Kraft Macaroni & Cheese Dinner, a Subway sandwich. All of these companies have dropped ingredients over the past year in response to consumer demands. Meredith Rizzo/NPR; iStockphoto; PepsiCo; iStockphoto; iStockphoto hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR; iStockphoto; PepsiCo; iStockphoto; iStockphoto
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Drop-In Chefs Help Seniors Stay In Their Own Homes

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In This Museum, Visitors Can Eat At The Exhibits

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The government of Peru is partnering with culinary stars — like celebrity chef Gaston Acurio, shown here in his restaurant Astrid & Gaston in Lima in 2014 — to promote Peruvian cuisine around the world. Ernesto Benavides/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ernesto Benavides/AFP/Getty Images