Health Health

Roger Severino Discusses The HHS Division Of Conscience And Religious Freedom

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578956922/578956923" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Department of Health and Humans Services is adding a Division of Conscience and Religious Freedom to protect doctors, nurses and other health care workers who refuse to take part in some kinds of care because of moral or religious objections. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Trump Admin Will Protect Health Workers Who Refuse Services On Religious Grounds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578811426/578957003" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Aaron Hernandez (81), of the New England Patriots, lost his helmet during this play against the New York Jets in 2011. Hernandez killed himself in 2017, and researchers found that he had had one of the most severe cases of CTE ever seen in someone his age. Elsa/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Elsa/Getty Images

Repeated Head Hits, Not Just Concussions, May Lead To A Type Of Chronic Brain Damage

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578355877/578957009" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

News Brief: HHS To Protect Religious Objectors, Trump's First Year Poll, Apple Jobs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578800222/578800223" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Republicans Blame Medicaid For Contributing To Opioid Epidemic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578800264/578800265" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An NPR investigation finds that people with intellectual disabilities suffer one of the highest rates of sexual assault — and that compared with other rape victims, they are even more likely to be assaulted by someone they know. Cornelia Li for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Cornelia Li for NPR

From The Frontlines Of A Sexual Assault Epidemic: 2 Therapists Share Stories

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/577065301/578800328" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Mathilde Krim at the World AIDS Day Symposium presented by the Foundation For AIDS Research and the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in 2002. Krim had a knack for helping people talk about HIV/AIDS rationally, colleagues say. Theo Wargo/WireImage hide caption

toggle caption
Theo Wargo/WireImage

Pioneering HIV Researcher Mathilde Krim Remembered For Her Activism

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578622732/578666228" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

On Wednesday Walmart began distributing a new solution to help customers dispose of leftover opioid prescriptions. But CDC says, just flush them down the toilet. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Ronda Goldfein, attorney and executive director of the AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania, holds an envelope that revealed a person's HIV status through the clear window. Elana Gordon/WHYY hide caption

toggle caption
Elana Gordon/WHYY

Aetna Agrees To Pay $17 Million In HIV Privacy Breach

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/572312972/578800337" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Are Implanted Medical Devices Creating A 'Danger Within Us'?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578562873/578639820" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Patrick States slices into a venison steak at his home in Northglenn, Colo. Officials are asking hunters to have their kills tested before consuming the meat. Sam Brasch/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Sam Brasch/Colorado Public Radio

Colin Campbell, shown last month in his home near Los Angeles, was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease — ALS — eight years ago. He gets Medicare because of his disability, but was incorrectly told by several agencies that he couldn't use it for home care. Instead, he pays $4,000 a month for those services. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Hydrocodone-acetaminophen pills, also known as Vicodin, arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt. A new report from the National Safety Council says the abuse of prescription opioids has helped fuel an epidemic in overdoses. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Toby Talbot/AP

A man gets ready to let one loose. Not pictured: all the folks around him diving for cover. CSA-Printstock/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
CSA-Printstock/Getty Images/iStockphoto

President Trump shakes hands with White House physician Ronny Jackson, following his annual physical at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Jan. 12. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

White House Doctor Says Trump Is In 'Excellent' Physical, Cognitive Health

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578424523/578452077" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

As Flu Season Strains Hospitals, Doctor Offers Advice For How To Stay Healthy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578422409/578422411" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

White House Physician Says Trump Is In 'Excellent Health'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578422438/578422449" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After Charleston chef Ben Murray committed suicide, Mickey Bakst (left) and Steve Palmer (right) started a support group for those in the restaurant business struggling with addiction. Andrew Cebulka/Phase: 3 Marketing and Communications hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Cebulka/Phase: 3 Marketing and Communications