Health Health

Emily Blair, a medical assistant at the Colon, Stomach and Liver Center in Lansdowne, Va., takes a blood pressure reading for Robert Koenen. New guidelines say that patients should have their arm resting on a surface while taking a reading and both feet should be placed flat on the ground. Josh Loock/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Josh Loock/NPR

Odds Are, They're Taking Your Blood Pressure All Wrong

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/564832694/565288760" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Lots of families fight over politics at the holiday table. But decisions about which foods to put on the table can whip up stress and squabbles, too. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
PeopleImages/Getty Images

It's Not Just Politics. Food Can Stir Holiday Conflict, Too

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/564901919/565288754" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Out Of Bounds: From A Coma To 'Dancing With The Stars'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/565153461/565153462" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In his new book, Dr. Aaron Carroll explains that there might be less evidence against some notoriously bad foods than we think. MHJ/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
MHJ/Getty Images

'The Bad Food Bible' Says Your Eating Might Not Be So Sinful After All

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/564879018/565153489" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This is likely a pit toilet. The idea is that there's a giant hole underneath the toilet. It's from Revben and Havenes Banda's home in a rural village in Malawi. They live with their five children and five grandchildren; their monthly income is $50. Zoriah Miller for Dollar Street hide caption

toggle caption
Zoriah Miller for Dollar Street

Distracted driving is a growing problem, accounting for at least 12 percent of road crashes worldwide. Young men are more likely to be distracted, a study finds. Kathleen Finlay/Cultura RF/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kathleen Finlay/Cultura RF/Getty Images

Sam Kass speaks at TED Talks Live - Education Revolution. Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash/TED hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash/TED

Sam Kass: Can Free Breakfast Improve Learning?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/564606692/564640330" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mileha Soneji speaks at TEDxDelft 2015. TEDxDelft hide caption

toggle caption
TEDxDelft

Mileha Soneji: Can Simple Innovations Improve The Lives of Parkinson's Patients?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/564578645/564639446" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Amos Winter's Leveraged Freedom Chair. Courtesy of GRIT hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of GRIT

Amos Winter: How Do You Build An All-Terrain Wheelchair For The Developing World?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/564636938/564643489" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Myriam Sidibe on the TED Stage. Ryan Lash/TED hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Lash/TED

Myriam Sidibe: Would Fewer Children Die of Disease If They Just Washed Their Hands?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/564609356/564642815" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript