Health Health

Chalfonte LeNee Queen of San Diego grappled with violent vomiting episodes for 17 years until she found out her illness was related to her marijuana use. Pauline Bartolone/California Healthline hide caption

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Pauline Bartolone/California Healthline

Rare And Mysterious Vomiting Illness Linked To Heavy Marijuana Use

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Alejandra Borunda, sits with her two children, Natalia, 11, and Raul, 8, holding the family dog at their home in Aurora, Colo. Borunda's children are among those who would lose out if the CHIP program isn't funded. Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post via Getty Images

States Sound Warning That Kids' Health Insurance Is At Risk

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When the Northville Psychiatric Hospital closed, many of the patients either had to leave southeast Michigan for hospitals elsewhere in the state or ended up in community programs that haven't always met their needs, an advocacy group says. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

A coalition of mental health advocacy groups is calling on federal regulators, state agencies and employers to conduct random audits of insurers to make sure they are in compliance with the federal Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008. Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Peter Saltonstall, president of the National Organization of Rare Disorders, speaks at a rally Tuesday in support of tax credits for companies that develop drugs for rare diseases. Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN

Bacterial cells can now read a synthetic genetic code and use it to assemble proteins containing man-made parts. Gary Bates/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Bates/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Scientists Train Bacteria To Build Unnatural Proteins

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Gene Therapy Shows Promise For A Growing List Of Diseases

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