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A baby born with microcephaly in Brazil is examined by a neurologist. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

Zika Is Linked To Microcephaly, Health Agencies Confirm

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A Madison Water Utility Crew works to dig up and replace a broken water shutoff box in preparation for a larger pipe-lining project. Madison started using copper instead of lead pipes in the late 1920s. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

Avoiding A Future Crisis, Madison Removed Lead Water Pipes 15 Years Ago

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FDA Approves Experimental Zika Screening For Blood Donations

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Opioid Epidemic Sparks HIV Outbreak In Tiny Indiana Town

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A Bolivian farmer harvests organic quinoa in his fields in Puerto Perez, Bolivia. Some researchers are working with quinoa farmers in Bolivia and Peru to try to develop internal markets for threatened varieties — for example, in hospital and school food programs. Juan Karita/AP hide caption

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Juan Karita/AP

Industrial Science Hunts For Nursing Home Fraud In New Mexico Case

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"Everyone that's in there right now has probably done it," Clyde Polly says about Opana injections at his home. Seth Herald for NPR hide caption

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Seth Herald for NPR

Inside A Small Brick House At The Heart Of Indiana's Opioid Crisis

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A Myanmarese migrant and her child seek care at a refugee health clinic in Mae Sot, Thailand. Mae Sot, a town along the Thai-Myanmar border, is home to many Myanmarese migrants, some of whom are there illegally. Wudan Yan/for NPR hide caption

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Wudan Yan/for NPR

The village of Hoosick Falls, N.Y., sits along the Hoosick River in eastern New York. Elevated levels of a suspected carcinogen known as PFOA were found in the village's well water, which is now filtered. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

Elevated Levels Of Suspected Carcinogen Found In States' Drinking Water

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Doctors Grapple With When To Prescribe Opioids For Pain

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Dr. Dorry Segev (right), of Johns Hopkins Medicine, led the team of doctors that transplanted an HIV-positive liver and kidney into two different HIV-positive patients this month. Johns Hopkins Medicine hide caption

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Johns Hopkins Medicine

New Source Of Transplant Organs For Patients With HIV: Others With HIV

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Obama Task Force Director On The Cancer 'Moonshot' Initiative

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Fatty plaque (shown here in yellow) blocks about 60 percent of this coronary artery's width. The increasing thickness of artery walls is just one factor that can increase vulnerability to a heart attack or stroke. Prof. P.M. Motta/G. Macchiarelli, S.A. Nottola/Science Source hide caption

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Prof. P.M. Motta/G. Macchiarelli, S.A. Nottola/Science Source

Possible Heart Benefits Of Taking Estrogen Get Another Look

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A pregnant woman gets an ultrasound to monitor for the birth defect microcephaly, in Guatemala City last month. Johan Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johan Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images

Pregnant Women May Be Able To Get Answers About Zika Earlier

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