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Scientists Discover New Disease Caused By Prion Protein

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Some Veterans Affairs Reforms Undermine Medical Recruitment Efforts

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Dr. David Burkons holds the licensing certificates that allowed him to open a clinic that provides medical and surgical abortions. It took about 18 extra months of inspections, he says, to get the approval to offer surgical abortions. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN

Bucking Trend, Ohio Doctor Opens Clinic That Provides Abortion Services

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Oliver Sacks was an author, physician and a professor of neurology at the New York University School of Medicine. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris McGrath/Getty Images

Oliver Sacks: A Neurologist At The 'Intersection Of Fact And Fable'

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Detweiler was surprised to learn she wasn't eating enough to fuel her training regimen. As an athlete, doctors and nutritionists say, she needed more food variety and more calories — three snacks daily, as well as bigger meals. Courtesy of Nationwide Children's Hospital hide caption

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Courtesy of Nationwide Children's Hospital

To Thrive, Many Young Female Athletes Need A Lot More Food

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Eat fish or take a fish oil supplement? Research suggests eating fish regularly over a lifetime is good for the brain. But when it comes to staving off cognitive decline in seniors, fish oil supplements just don't cut it, a study finds. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

If Fish Is Brain Food, Can Fish Oil Pills Boost Brains, Too?

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As Heroin Addiction Grows, Maine Focuses On Drug Enforcement

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Eggs may be more vulnerable to freezing than embryos, but that's just one factor that affects the odds of having a baby with frozen eggs. Jean-Paul Chassenet/Science Source hide caption

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Jean-Paul Chassenet/Science Source

Planned Parenthood Says Experts Found Misleading Edits In Videos

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Dr. Bill Mahon says a gorgeous coast and the chance to practice a more personal style of community medicine lured him to remote Fort Bragg, Calif., 35 years ago. Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED hide caption

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Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED