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Mimi Morales recovers in Children's Hospital of Orange Country in late September after surgery for a dental infection she contracted at Children's Dental Group in Anaheim, Calif. She had three permanent teeth, one baby tooth and part of her jawbone removed. Mindy Schauer/Courtesy of The Orange County Register hide caption

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Mindy Schauer/Courtesy of The Orange County Register

A government worker sprays mosquito insecticide fog in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, earlier this month to block the spread of Zika. The U.S. CDC advises pregnant women to reconsider plans to travel to Malaysia and 10 other countries because of the virus. Joshua Paul/AP hide caption

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Joshua Paul/AP

Pregnant Women Should Consider Not Traveling To Southeast Asia

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A new rule by an agency within the Department of Health and Human Services preserves the right of patients and families to sue nursing homes in court. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Sarepta Therapeutics was awarded a voucher for a fast-track drug review by the Food and Drug Administration when the company's medicine for Duchenne muscular dystropy was approved Sept. 19. Now Sarepta is looking to sell the voucher to the highest bidder. Mick Wiggins/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Mick Wiggins/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Luz Barajas took her son Carlos Cholico to get his flu shot at Crawford Kids Clinic in Aurora, Colo., last year. Health officials say there is some evidence the flu shot is more protective than the nasal flu vaccine. Brent Lewis/The Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Brent Lewis/The Denver Post via Getty Images

Rats are great at remembering where they last sniffed the strawberries. Alexey Krasaven/Flickr hide caption

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Alexey Krasaven/Flickr

Rats That Reminisce May Lead To Better Tests For Alzheimer's Drugs

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A multi-million dollar effort to produce a test to guide treatment for a potentially lethal skin cancer recently fell apart after the scientific investigator discovered that the commercial antibodies he was using were unreliable. Cultura RM Exclusive/Peter Mulle/Getty Images hide caption

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Cultura RM Exclusive/Peter Mulle/Getty Images

A job reviewing drug applications at the Food and Drug Administration can be the springboard for a career in industry. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Marlene Simpson of Sacramento, Calif., wears compression bandages daily to help reduce the swelling in her legs. She is getting fitted for compression bandages for her arms to prevent swelling there. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/KQED

These Women Discovered It Wasn't Just Fat: It Was Lipedema

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New York Fertility Doctor Says He Created Baby With 3 Genetic Parents

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