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Graciela Garcia, 19, married her high school friend, Jaime, when she was 15. Natasha Pizzey hide caption

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Natasha Pizzey

Why Child Marriage Persists In Mexico

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A chimpanzee skull, at left, and a human skull. Scientists are probing why our brains evolved so differently despite many similarities. D. Roberts/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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D. Roberts/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Doctors often prescribe more opioid painkillers than necessary following surgery, for a variety of reasons. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Tatiana Curran, right, and her boyfriend Jake Cowen-Whitman say their three-year relationship is an anomaly amongst their peers. But they readily concede that even they have serious issues around intimacy. Tovia Smith/NPR hide caption

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Tovia Smith/NPR

Dr. Terry Horton, chief of addiction medicine and medical director of Project Engage at Christiana Care Health System, testified about opioid addiction before a U.S. Senate committee in May. Courtesy of Christiana Care Health System hide caption

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Courtesy of Christiana Care Health System

Asking About Opioids: A Treatment Plan Can Make All The Difference

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A new report reveals how the industry influenced research in the 1960s to deflect concerns about the impact of sugar on health — including pulling the plug on a study it funded. Karen M. Romanko/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen M. Romanko/Getty Images

What The Industry Knew About Sugar's Health Effects, But Didn't Tell Us

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Ruby Corado (left) with her friend and Casa Ruby board member Consuella Lopez on the porch of one of the transitional group homes Corado runs in Washington, D.C., in 2015. Lexey Swall/GRAIN for NPR hide caption

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Lexey Swall/GRAIN for NPR

Health Care System Fails Many Transgender Americans

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Nick Vargas talks with Dr. Kathryn Hall at The Source, an LGBT center in Visalia, Calif. Hall says that time and time again, her patients tell her they're afraid to come out to their other doctors. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

'Here It Goes': Coming Out To Your Doctor In Rural America

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Doctors think the chronic pain of "shoulder impingement" may arise from age-related tendon and muscle degeneration, or from a bone spur that can rub against a tendon. Michele Constantini/PhotoAlto/Getty Images hide caption

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Michele Constantini/PhotoAlto/Getty Images

Popular Surgery To Ease Chronic Shoulder Pain Called Into Question

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U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams, shown here testifying before a Senate committee in 2017, says President Trump's top health priority is addressing opioid addiction. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

U.S. Surgeon General Says Working Together Is Key To Combating Opioid Crisis

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