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An aerial view of the Lewisburg prison complex in Pennsylvania. Google Earth hide caption

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Google Earth

Lawsuit Says Lewisburg Prison Counsels Prisoners With Crossword Puzzles

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Mansoor al-Dayfi sits in his apartment in Serbia. He was resettled there after serving 14 years in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Screenshot courtesy of Frontline (PBS) hide caption

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Screenshot courtesy of Frontline (PBS)

'Out Of Gitmo': Released Guantanamo Detainee Struggles In His New Home

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Ed Howard, an attorney specializing in consumer issues, and his sister had trouble obtaining price information while trying to plan their father's funeral. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Despite Decades-Old Law, Funeral Prices Are Still Unclear

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Ellen Bethea and her great-grandson, Lucas, look at a painting of her late husband, Archie. Laura Heald for NPR hide caption

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Laura Heald for NPR

You Could Pay Thousands Less For A Funeral Just By Crossing The Street

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The sun illuminates a row of homes at Park Plaza Cooperative in Fridley, Minn. Five years ago, the residents formed a nonprofit co-op and bought their entire neighborhood from the company that owned it. Bridget Bennett for NPR hide caption

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Bridget Bennett for NPR

When Residents Take Ownership, A Mobile Home Community Thrives

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Dawn Tachell looks at the trash and debris that have collected in her community. Conditions in the neighborhood have become so bad that some people have abandoned their houses and moved out. Jed Conklin for NPR hide caption

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Jed Conklin for NPR

Mobile Home Park Owners Can Spoil An Affordable American Dream

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The Pentagon building complex is seen from Air Force One on June 29. An Army review concludes that commanders did nothing wrong when they kicked out more than 22,000 soldiers for misconduct after they came back from Iraq or Afghanistan – even though all of those troops had been diagnosed with mental health problems or brain injuries. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Senators, Military Specialists Say Army Report On Dismissed Soldiers Is Troubling

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Bill Minick, the president of PartnerSource, a Texas company that writes and administers opt-out plans, vowed that despite the Oklahoma Supreme Court decision, he would continue efforts to promote alternative plans in other states. Dylan Hollingsworth for ProPublica hide caption

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Dylan Hollingsworth for ProPublica

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health sent a mobile testing unit to a fire station in Wharton, W.Va., in 2012 to screen coal miners for black lung disease. Howard Berkes/NPR hide caption

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Howard Berkes/NPR

The Special Management Unit at Lewisburg prison, which was created in 2009 for "dangerously violent, confrontational, defiant, antagonistic inmates," has received many complaints about its use of restraints on inmates. Angie Wang for NPR hide caption

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Angie Wang for NPR

Inside Lewisburg Prison: A Choice Between A Violent Cellmate Or Shackles

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West Virginia billionaire businessman Jim Justice announced his run for governor of West Virginia as a Democrat in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., on May 11, 2015. Chris Tilley/AP hide caption

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Chris Tilley/AP

Haitians outside a Red Cross field hospital in Carrefour, Haiti, on Dec. 14, 2010, 11 months after a magnitude 7.0 earthquake hit the country's capital, Port-au-Prince. Thony Belizaire/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Thony Belizaire/AFP/Getty Images

Report: Red Cross Spent 25 Percent Of Haiti Donations On Internal Expenses

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Davontae Sanford stands with his mother, Taminko Sanford, during a news conference a day after he was released from prison. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Court Fines And Fees Almost Delay Homecoming For Wrongly Convicted Michigan Man

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Doug Quinn stands on the empty lot where his house used to be. Bryan Thomas for NPR hide caption

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Bryan Thomas for NPR

Business Of Disaster: Insurance Firms Profited $400 Million After Sandy

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Nick and Diane Camerada stand inside their home on Staten Island, N.Y. During Superstorm Sandy, the Cameradas had water up to the second floor of their home. More than three years later, they are still living in a home that is only partially renovated while continuing to deal with bureaucratic nightmares. Bryan Thomas for NPR hide caption

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Bryan Thomas for NPR

Business Of Disaster: Local Recovery Programs Struggle To Help Homeowners

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One of the last family photos of Bernard Simmons is shown by his sister, Debra Simmons, in her home in Chicago. Peter Hoffman for NPR hide caption

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Peter Hoffman for NPR

Doubling Up Prisoners In 'Solitary' Creates Deadly Consequences

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Rachel Jenkins outside her home in Boley, Okla. Jenkins settled her case with ResCare, who denied her medical benefits and lost pay after she injured her shoulder at work. Nick Oxford hide caption

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Nick Oxford

Bob Ebeling, now 89, at his home in Brigham City, Utah. Howard Berkes/NPR hide caption

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Howard Berkes/NPR

Your Letters Helped Challenger Shuttle Engineer Shed 30 Years Of Guilt

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Larry Morrison, who returned home with post-traumatic stress disorder after four tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, is being kicked out of the Army for misconduct, leaving him without military benefits. Michael de Yoanna/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Michael de Yoanna/Colorado Public Radio

Senators Want Moratorium On Dismissing Soldiers During Investigation

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