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The team led by Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller is set to interview a number of current administration officials, a top White House attorney tells NPR. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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The First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, shown on Nov. 12, was turned into a memorial to honor those who died on Nov. 5. Devin Patrick Kelley shot and killed 26 people and wounded 20 others when he opened fire during Sunday service at the church in Sutherland Springs, Texas. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

A sign advertising a water sale sits on a farm outside Del Norte, Colorado. Luke Runyon/KUNC hide caption

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Luke Runyon/KUNC

To Save Their Water Supply, Colorado Farmers Taxed Themselves

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Roy Moore, GOP candidate for Senate in Alabama, waits to speak during an event with supporters Thursday. Moore, who has been accused of sexual assault by multiple women, has refused to drop out. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lifted a ban on importing sport-hunted trophies of elephants from Zimbabwe and Zambia. But President Trump wants to review the decision. Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images

The State Department says the office of the Palestine Liberation Organization in Washington, D.C., must close under a little-known provision in U.S. law that forbids it from requesting Israelis be prosecuted for crimes against Palestinians. Mandel Ngan /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan /AFP/Getty Images

An army soldier stands guard as protesters demanding President Robert Mugabe stand down, gather on the road leading to State House in Harare, Zimbabwe, on Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017. Ben Curtis/AP hide caption

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Ben Curtis/AP

Franco-Tunisian fashion designer Azzedine Alaia poses during an exposition of Britain's artist Richard Wentworth photographic work on fashion design on Sept. 7, 2017 at the Maison Alaia in Paris. Francios Guillot /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Francios Guillot /AFP/Getty Images

A third of Native Americans say they have experienced discrimination in the work place when seeking jobs, getting promotions and earning equal pay, according to a new poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard TH Chan school of public health. Dylan Johnson for NPR hide caption

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Dylan Johnson for NPR

As Native Americans Face Job Discrimination, A Tribe Works To Employ Its Own

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Then-candidate Donald Trump walks onstage at a presidential debate in St. Louis two days after a video was released, in which he is heard talking to Access Hollywood host Billy Bush about sexually assaulting women. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

The core of the RBT-3 reactor at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors in Dimitrovgrad, Russia. Some scientists suspect the institute's work on medical isotopes might explain radioactivity detected over Europe. Sovfoto/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Sovfoto/UIG via Getty Images

Clues In That Mysterious Radioactive Cloud Point Toward Russia

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Special counsel Robert Mueller has brought the Foreign Agents Registration Act into the spotlight with indictments last month of Paul Manafort and his longtime business associate Rick Gates. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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A laptop in the Netherlands was one of hundreds of thousands infected by ransomware in May. The malware reportedly originated with the NSA. Rob Engelaar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rob Engelaar/AFP/Getty Images

A Bangladeshi child works in a brick-breaking yard in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The broken bricks are mixed in with concrete. Typically working barefoot and with rough utensils, a child worker earns less than $2 a day. Mehedi Hasan/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Mehedi Hasan/NurPhoto via Getty Images

A technician examines the mirror on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Scientists at two national laboratories are currently building the components for an enormous digital camera that will capture images from the telescope. Joe McNally/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe McNally/Getty Images

The Largest Digital Camera In The World Takes Shape

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The FAA approved a Pulse Vapor drone like this one — but outfitted with LTE radios and antennas — to provide temporary voice, data, and internet service in Puerto Rico. Mary Esch/AP hide caption

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Mary Esch/AP