In 2015, Medicaid spending topped $552 billion nationwide. People who receive both Medicaid and Medicare and people with disabilities account for more than half of Medicaid spending. Katarzyna Bialasiewicz/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Katarzyna Bialasiewicz/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Limits In GOP Plan Could Shrink Seniors' Long-Term Health Benefits

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Former Vice President Joe Biden (center) speaks during an event held by Democrats on Wednesday to mark the seventh anniversary of the Affordable Care Act. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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A baby receives the rotavirus vaccine during a clinical trial in Niger. The new vaccine is the first designed specifically for children in sub-Saharan Africa. It doesn't require refrigeration and will be cheaper than ones currently available. Krishan Cheyenne/MSF hide caption

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Secretary of State Rex Tillerson speaks Wednesday at the meeting of the Global Coalition on the Defeat of ISIS in Washington. Top officials from the 68-nation coalition are looking to increase pressure on ISIS. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Tillerson: Defeating ISIS 'No. 1 Goal' for U.S., But Others Should Do More

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U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts wrote the unanimous opinion in today's ruling. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

The Supreme Court Rules In Favor Of A Special Education Student

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Judge Neil Gorsuch listens to senators' opening statements during first day of his Supreme Court confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee in the Hart Senate Office Building on Monday in Washington, DC. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Barry Cadden, center, an owner of the New England Compounding Center, was acquitted of 25 counts of second-degree murder of people who received tainted steroids manufactured by the pharmacy. He was found guilty of racketeering and mail fraud. Here, Cadden is shown arriving at the federal courthouse last week. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Former Donald Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, seen here last June, was paid millions of dollars to advance a pro-Russian agenda, the AP reports. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Former Trump Campaign Head Manafort Was Paid Millions By A Putin Ally, AP Says

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People watch news footage of a missile launch outside the main railway station in Pyongyang earlier this month. A North Korean missile test failed just moments after launch Wednesday, according to the U.S. and South Korea. Kim Won-Jin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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When two men who were born in Germany but whose families are from Algeria and Nigeria were arrested on terrorism charges in February, police displayed items seized in a raid. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Former New York Times journalist Judith Miller along with her legal team including Robert Bennett, right, leaves U.S. District Court in Washington in 2007. Miller was jailed for nearly three months after refusing to testify in a CIA leak investigation. Kevin Wolf/AP hide caption

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Kevin Wolf/AP

The Flame Refluxer is essentially a big copper blanket: think Brillo pad of wool sandwiched between mesh. Using it while burning off oil yields less air pollution and residue that harms marine life. Courtesy of Worcester Polytechnic Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Researchers Test Hotter, Faster And Cleaner Way To Fight Oil Spills

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Former Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, a Republican, speaks to a crowd of Donald Trump supporters at a Trump campaign rally in Tucson, Ariz., in 2016. Brewer sided with Arizona Democrats to expand Medicaid eligibility in the state under Obamacare. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Repeal Of Health Law Could Force Tough Decisions For Arizona Republicans

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A model of a Karl Marx statue was briefly on display in central Trier earlier this month. City of Trier Press Office hide caption

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City of Trier Press Office

German City Accepts Karl Marx Statue From China, But Not Everyone's Happy

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Ivanka Trump arrives for a joint news conference between President Trump and German Chancellor Angela Merkel in the East Room of the White House earlier this month. Ethics experts say that Ivanka Trump's dual role as a business owner and West Wing staffer raises questions about conflicts of interest. Ivanka says she will comply voluntarily with ethics rules. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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An Etihad Airways jet is parked at JFK International Airport in New York on Tuesday. Passengers traveling to the United States from 10 airports in eight Muslim-majority countries will have to check most electronics. The ban will affect flights on Royal Jordanian, EgyptAir, Turkish Airlines, Saudi Arabian Airlines, Kuwait Airways, Royal Air Maroc, Qatar Airways, Emirates and Etihad Airways. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Many people who are on Medicaid are also in college or taking care of relatives, according to health policy analyst Leighton Ku. That would make it harder for them to meet work requirements proposed by the GOP. Courtesy of Milken Institute School of Public Health hide caption

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Courtesy of Milken Institute School of Public Health

It's Not Clear How Many People Could Actually Work To Get Medicaid

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Spectators look down on the Nevada Assembly on the opening day of the legislative session in Carson City, Nev., in February. On Monday, members of the Assembly voted to adopt the Equal Rights Amendment. Lance Iversen/AP hide caption

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Nevada On Cusp Of Ratifying Equal Rights Amendment 35 Years After Deadline

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