Political Data & Technology Political Data & Technology

It has become increasingly common for politicians at all levels of government to block followers, whether it's for uncivil behavior or merely for expressing a different point of view. HStocks/Getty Images hide caption

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HStocks/Getty Images

Robb Willer on the TED stage Video still courtesy of TED hide caption

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Video still courtesy of TED

Robb Willer: How Do We Bridge The Political Divide?

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A roll of "I Voted" stickers sits on a table at an elementary school during the U.S. presidential election on November 8, 2016 in Dearborn, Mich. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP/Getty Images

Former state Sens. Dale Schultz, at podium, and Tim Cullen discuss gerrymandering in Wisconsin. Ailsa Chang/NPR hide caption

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Ailsa Chang/NPR

Renewed Calls For Patriotism Over Politics When Drawing District Lines

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President Trump holds a rally for Alabama Republican Senate candidate Luther Strange on Sept. 22 in Huntsville, Ala. After Strange lost the primary race, Trump's tweets promoting him were deleted. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

From left, Bill Wanlund of the Falls Church electoral board, Jessica Wilson of voting machine company Hart InterCivic and David Bjerke, the Falls Church director of elections test the city's new voting machines ahead of this November's election. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

Learning 2016's Lessons, Virginia Prepares Election Cyberdefenses

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President Trump's cooperation with congressional Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi (left) and Chuck Schumer (center) appears to have won public approval. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Russian-backed hackers targeted election systems in 21 states but federal officials had not told state election officials which states were targeted until now. Tami Chapell/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tami Chapell/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook and Twitter appear to be key platforms in Russia's interference in the 2016 election; investigators want to know more. Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images

New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner (from right), Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach and former Ohio Secretary of State Ken Blackwell at the second meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, on Tuesday. Holly Ramer/AP hide caption

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Holly Ramer/AP

Tension And Protests Mark Trump Voting Commission Meeting

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Glenn Simpson, a former reporter who later helped found a private investigation firm, sat down with Senate Judiciary Committee staff behind closed doors on Tuesday, congressional aides told NPR. Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

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Liam James Doyle/NPR