Political Data & Technology Political Data & Technology

President Trump, flanked by Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach and Vice President Pence, speaks during the first meeting of his Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity in July. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton holds a news conference in 2014 with running mate Tina Smith in St. Paul, Minn. Dayton has named Smith to take Al Franken's seat in the U.S. Senate. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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Jim Mone/AP

Donald Trump signs a dollar bill for a supporter during a campaign rally in Richmond, Va., during the presidential campaign. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Tax Bill Could Offer New Way To Funnel Political Cash — And Make It Tax-Deductible

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A motorist guides his vehicle to a drop an election ballot at a drive-through collection site outside the election commission headquarters in Denver on Nov. 7, 2017. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Colorado Launches First In The Nation Post-Election Audits

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It has become increasingly common for politicians at all levels of government to block followers, whether it's for uncivil behavior or merely for expressing a different point of view. HStocks/Getty Images hide caption

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HStocks/Getty Images

Robb Willer on the TED stage Video still courtesy of TED hide caption

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Video still courtesy of TED

Robb Willer: How Do We Bridge The Political Divide?

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A roll of "I Voted" stickers sits on a table at an elementary school during the U.S. presidential election on November 8, 2016 in Dearborn, Mich. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP/Getty Images

Former state Sens. Dale Schultz, at podium, and Tim Cullen discuss gerrymandering in Wisconsin. Ailsa Chang/NPR hide caption

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Ailsa Chang/NPR

Renewed Calls For Patriotism Over Politics When Drawing District Lines

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President Trump holds a rally for Alabama Republican Senate candidate Luther Strange on Sept. 22 in Huntsville, Ala. After Strange lost the primary race, Trump's tweets promoting him were deleted. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

From left, Bill Wanlund of the Falls Church electoral board, Jessica Wilson of voting machine company Hart InterCivic and David Bjerke, the Falls Church director of elections test the city's new voting machines ahead of this November's election. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

Learning 2016's Lessons, Virginia Prepares Election Cyberdefenses

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President Trump's cooperation with congressional Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi (left) and Chuck Schumer (center) appears to have won public approval. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images