President Kennedy addresses a joint session of Congress on Jan. 30, 1961. STF/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Past Presidents Made History In First Address To Congress

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Kuwait is holding its National Day celebration at the Trump International Hotel in Washington. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Kuwait Celebration At Trump Hotel Raises Conflict Of Interest Questions

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Even after the Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage, there have been efforts to pass a religious freedom bill. LGBTQ rights advocates believe lawmakers anticipate support from the Trump administration. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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LGBTQ Advocates Fear 'Religious Freedom' Bills Moving Forward In States

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Federal conflict-of-interest laws require officials like commerce secretary nominee Wilbur Ross (right) to divest holdings, but President Trump is not covered by those requirements. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethics Watchdog Has Big Impact On Federal Workers, But Not On Trump

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White House reporters line up Friday in Washington in hopes of attending a briefing in press secretary Sean Spicer's office. The off-camera briefing was limited mostly to pool reporters, broadcast networks and conservative-leaning outlets, with reporters for CNN, The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times and others denied entry. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

President Trump speaks on the final morning of CPAC at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center in Maryland. Marian Carrasquero/NPR hide caption

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Marian Carrasquero/NPR

Trump And CPAC: A Complicated Relationship No More

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President Trump's deputy assistant Sebastian Gorka participates in a discussion during the Conservative Political Action Conference on Friday. Gorka has been the subject of criticism by others in the counterterrorism field. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, seen here walking toward the Oval Office in January, had been in touch with the FBI over media reports about Trump associates and contacts with Russia, according to a senior administration official. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Some environmental justice advocates say California's cap-and-trade program hasn't done anything to clean up the air in low-income communities like Wilmington, where refineries are located near residential neighborhoods. Maya Sugarman/KPCC hide caption

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Maya Sugarman/KPCC

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference at the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center Thursday at National Harbor, Md. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (center) speaks onstage at CPAC in National Harbor, Md., with White House adviser Steve Bannon (left) and American Conservative Union Chairman Matt Schlapp on Thursday. Mike Theiler/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Edward Price resigned from his position at the CIA on Feb. 14 after working there since 2006. Courtesy of Edward Price hide caption

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Courtesy of Edward Price

Disgusted By Trump, A CIA Officer Quits. How Many More Could Follow?

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Gavin Grimm is the plaintiff in a case scheduled to be argued before the U.S. Supreme Court in March. Grimm sued the school board in Gloucester, Va., after it passed a rule barring transgender students from using school restrooms that match their gender identity. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Gavin Grimm speaks during an interview at his home in Gloucester, Va., in 2015. Grimm sued his school district for the right to use the boys' bathroom; the case is scheduled to be argued before the Supreme Court next month. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., speaks during the Munich Security Conference last week. McCain's office has confirmed that while he was overseas, he met with U.S. forces in Syria about defeating ISIS. Matthias Schrader/AP hide caption

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