Politics NPR's expanded coverage of U.S. and world politics, the latest news from Congress and the White House, and elections.

Americans give President Trump relatively positive marks on his handling of ISIS and the state of the economy. Olivier Douliery/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Olivier Douliery/Pool/Getty Images

Majority Of Americans See Trump's First Year As A Failure

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578639915/578800311" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump, with House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn og Texas, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, speaks to reporters after a recent retreat where GOP leaders made plans for 2018. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

Steve Bannon, former adviser to President Trump, arrives at a House Intelligence Committee closed-door meeting, on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Bannon And Trump White House Raising Questions About Executive Privilege, Lawyers Say

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578634802/578734835" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

An NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds special counsel Robert Mueller is largely unknown to the public, which puts him in a precarious position. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Americans generally have little confidence in the institutions that control the U.S. Brittany Mayes/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Brittany Mayes/NPR

Here's Just How Little Confidence Americans Have In Political Institutions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578422668/578705118" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in a case where a defense lawyer refused to follow the instructions of his client, who contended he was innocent. Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Liam James Doyle/NPR

In Supreme Court, Skepticism Of Lawyer Who Overrode Client's Wish To Plead Not Guilty

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578479044/578555346" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump shakes hands with White House physician Ronny Jackson, following his annual physical at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Jan. 12. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

White House Doctor Says Trump Is In 'Excellent' Physical, Cognitive Health

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578424523/578452077" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen looks on during a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill Tuesday. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Homeland Security Secretary Says She 'Did Not Hear' Trump Use 'That' Vulgar Word

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578415397/578422498" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Newt Gingrich, then speaker of the House in 1994, holds up a copy of the Republican Party's "Contract with America." Joshua Roberts/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joshua Roberts/AFP/Getty Images

A judge said she is puzzled by some of the legal positions taken by former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort and doesn't know when she might schedule his trial. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio takes questions from reporters about the relief effort in Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria on Sept. 26, 2017 at the U.S. Capitol. Rubio and Maryland Democrat Chris Van Hollen propose a new Senate bill that would require the intelligence community to report within one month of a federal election on whether there was foreign interference. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Washington, D.C., attorney Jeffrey Lovitky has taken it upon himself to sue President Trump. Peter Overby/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Peter Overby/NPR

For 1 Attorney, A Lonely Legal Fight To Make Trump Comply With Rules

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/577623436/578172792" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

House Rules Committee Chairman Pete Sessions, R-Texas, and Rep. Louise Slaughter, D-N.Y., the top Democrat on the committee, will hold hearings on earmarks this week. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

House GOP To Debate Bringing Earmarks Back

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/577639518/577867220" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Top intelligence bosses scrambled to the White House on Thursday morning after President Trump complained on Twitter about a controversial spy bill they then urged him to support. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

A White House statement issued Thursday notably did not deny that President Trump used the vulgarity to refer to African countries, but Friday morning, Trump wrote: "This was not the language used." Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carolyn Kaster/AP