The "broken windows" theory of policing suggested that cleaning up the visible signs of disorder — like graffiti, loitering, panhandling and prostitution — would prevent more serious crime. Image Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Image Source/Getty Images

Researcher Chris Lowe releases a juvenile white shark earlier this spring. Cal State Long Beach Shark Lab hide caption

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Cal State Long Beach Shark Lab

How An Interview With A Shark Researcher Wound Up Starring A Shark

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Handshake-Free Zones Target Spread Of Germs In The Hospital

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From NFL Player To Neurosurgeon: 'Why Can't I Do Both?'

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NASA Spacecraft Finds Storms On Jupiter

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The good old reflex hammer (like this Taylor model) might seem like an outdated medical device, but its role in diagnosing disease is still as important as ever. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A tractor pulls a planter while distributing corn seed on a field in Malden, Ill. Two scientists agree that pesticide-laden dust from planting equipment kills bees. But they're proposing different solutions, because they disagree about whether the pesticides are useful to farmers. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Market Forces May Impact Emissions More Than Climate Agreements

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Richard Dawkins On Terrorism And Religion

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Sometime between grade school and grad school, the brain's information highways get remapped in a way that dramatically boosts self-control. Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

As Brains Mature, More Robust Information Networks Boost Self-Control

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Marla Aufmuth/TED

Abigail Marsh: Are We Wired To Be Altruistic?

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This image shows Jupiter's south pole, as seen by NASA's Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles. The oval features are cyclones, up to 600 miles in diameter. NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles

Juno Spacecraft Reveals Spectacular Cyclones At Jupiter's Poles

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