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Environmental cues — like the color, size and shape of the dinnerware, the music playing in the background and the lighting in the dining room — can alter how we experience food and drink. For example, research suggests that serving food on a red plate tends to reduce the amount diners eat. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

One teaspoon of pure caffeine powder delivers about the same jolt as 25 cups of coffee. The Center for Science in the Public Interest hide caption

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The Center for Science in the Public Interest

Potent Powdered Caffeine Raises Safety Worries

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Scientists Bring The Sun Down To Earth To Learn How It Works

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Water vapor, which looks like smoke, is seen rising from a power plant near Hengshui in China's Hebei province. In November, President Obama announced a landmark carbon-cutting deal with China — the world's leading producer of greenhouse gases. And the Chinese government has announced plans to cap the use of coal within five years. Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images

2014 Brought Lasting Action On Climate Change Policy

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Tony McMichael has written more than 300 papers on how erratic weather and climate can cause health problems. He died in September. James Giggacher/Courtesy of Australian National University hide caption

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James Giggacher/Courtesy of Australian National University

Same-Sex Couples May Have More Egalitarian Relationships

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Doctors Not Cutting Back On Radiation For Breast Cancer Patients

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TED speakers share their stories about intense curiosity. iStock hide caption

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iStock

Playlist: Stories That Will Spark Your Imagination

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Tina Wolf demonstrates the use of naloxone to community members in Lindenhurst, N.Y., during an overdose prevention training. Georgia Dolan-Reilly (left) of the Suffolk County Prevention Resource Center helped with the training. Kevin Hagen for NPR hide caption

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Kevin Hagen for NPR

Teaching Friends And Family How To Reverse A Drug Overdose

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Recent research has shown that zebra finches sing differently when drunk, but not whether they know enough of the lyrics to get through "I Will Survive" or "Don't Stop Believin'." Liza Gross/Courtesy Public Library of Science hide caption

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Liza Gross/Courtesy Public Library of Science

Scientists Discover That Drunk Birds Sing Like Drunks

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From One Man's Damaged Brain, A Treasure Trove Of Research On Memory

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Beemer, shown at the Mars Society's Mars Desert Research Station in Utah in 2011, is a candidate for both Mars One and the Mars Arctic 365 program. Max Fagin hide caption

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Max Fagin

An Aspiring Martian Continues To Pursue The Red Planet

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A negative image of Kks3, made using the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. The core of the galaxy is the right hand dark object at the top center of the image. D. Makarov/Royal Astronomical Society hide caption

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D. Makarov/Royal Astronomical Society

Military Policy Impedes Research On Traumatic Brain Injuries

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By the 1960s, humpback whales and other whale species had been hunted extensively, sometimes to the point of near extinction. Then a recording of humpback whale songs helped shift public opinion on the hunting of all whale species. Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images

Recordings That Made Waves: The Songs That Saved The Whales

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