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Mosquito larvae fill the cup of stale water that entomologist Luis Hernandez dips from a stack of old tires in a suburb of San Juan, Puerto Rico. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Puerto Rico Races To Stop Zika's Mosquitoes Before Rains Begin

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A camera in the gondola of his balloon photographs Air Force Captain Joseph M. Kittinger Jr., as he starts the jump that set his record-breaking parachute jump over southern New Mexico on Aug. 8, 1960. Bettman/Corbis hide caption

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Bettman/Corbis

What It's Like To Freefall From 20 Miles Above The Earth

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Previous experience with dengue outbreaks in Puerto Rico has shown that even small amounts of standing water — as in the vases of cemeteries — can serve as breeding areas for the mosquitoes that carry dengue and Zika. Pan American Health Organization/Flickr hide caption

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Pan American Health Organization/Flickr

With CDC Help, Puerto Rico Aims To Get Ahead Of Zika

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Some doctors say clinicians can now get much more information from newer technology than they can get from a stethoscope. Clinging to the old tool isn't necessary, they say. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

The Stethoscope: Timeless Tool Or Outdated Relic?

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iStockphoto

Why Scientists Hope To Inject Some People With Zika Virus

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I know the way to Khan's place. The Kobal Collection hide caption

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The Kobal Collection

Beam Me Up, Scotty? Turns Out Your Brain Is Ready For Teleportation

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A farmer applies fertilizer to corn in Kasbeer, Ill. Scientists say one significant source of nitrogen pollution is fertilizer that leaches off of fields growing corn and soybeans to feed meat and dairy animals. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Each year, between 8,000 and 9,000 people nationwide complain to the government about nursing home evictions, according to federal data. That makes evictions the leading category of all nursing home complaints. shapecharge/Getty Images hide caption

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shapecharge/Getty Images

Nursing Home Evictions Strand The Disabled In Costly Hospitals

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Oil Producing Nations Struggle To Cope With Falling Prices

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CSIRO's Australia Telescope Compact Array at the Paul Wild Observatory. Alex Cherney hide caption

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Alex Cherney

In A Far-Off Galaxy, A Clue To What's Causing Strange Bursts Of Radio Waves

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Most women get prenatal care from the doctor they expect will deliver the baby, which can make it difficult if the doctor and hospital are far away. Tim Hale/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Hale/Getty Images