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Carlo Ratti of MIT designed this "supermarket of the future" exhibit. If you move a hand close to a product, a digital display lights up, providing information on origin, nutritional value and carbon footprint. Courtesy of COOP Italia hide caption

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Courtesy of COOP Italia

At World's Fair In Italy, The Future Of Food Is On The Table

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Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson and Carla Gugino star in the action thriller San Andreas. Jasin Boland /Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures hide caption

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Jasin Boland /Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

Fact-Checking 'San Andreas': Are Earthquake Swarms For Real?

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Russell Cobb/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Seeing What Isn't There: Inside Alzheimer's Hallucinations

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Why did a deliberately bad study showing the weight-loss benefits of chocolate get picked up by many news outlets? Science journalist John Bohannon — the man behind the study — says reporting on junk nutrition studies happens all the time. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Trickster Journalist Explains Why He Duped The Media On Chocolate Study

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There are legal questions about how far employers can go to encourage participation in wellness programs. Bjorn Rune Lie/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Bjorn Rune Lie/Ikon Images/Getty Images

When Are Employee Wellness Incentives No Longer Voluntary?

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Dan Byers, an elite-cattle breeder, checks the heartbeat on a newborn calf, born from an embryo implanted in a surrogate heifer. Because the calf was delivered via C-section, he sprinkles sweet molasses powder on her to prompt the surrogate mother cow to lick her clean. Abby Wendle/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Abby Wendle/Harvest Public Media

A security fence surrounds the main part of the U.S. Army's Dugway Proving Ground, a testing laboratory in the Utah desert. The Army says it mistakenly shipped live anthrax from Dugway to several labs in the U.S. and Korea. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

CDC Investigates Live Anthrax Shipments

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Experimental medicines related to ketamine, an anesthetic and club drug, are making progress in clinical tests. Wikipedia hide caption

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Wikipedia

Depression Treatments Inspired By Club Drug Move Ahead In Tests

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A team of scientists say they've discovered evidence of a 435,000 year old murder, based on evidence from the injuries on this skull. Javier Trueba/Madrid Scientific Films hide caption

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Javier Trueba/Madrid Scientific Films

Scientists Discover Evidence Of A 435,000-Year-Old Murder

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EPA Announces New Rules To Protect U.S. Waters

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Tuesday's decision by the U.S. Supreme Court to not review an ordinance passed by Alameda County, California, means that drug makers will now need to pay for collection and disposal of unused drugs in the county. iStockphoto hide caption

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