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Weather Technology Falters Amid Communication Breakdown

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Doctor Outlines Plan To Battle Antibiotic Resistance In 'The Washington Post'

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Frank Rossoto Stocktrek/Getty Images

From Medical Maggots To Stench Soup, 'Grunt' Explores The Science Of Warfare

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Monarchs spend their winters in the central mountains of Mexico before traveling up through the United States to Canada. Sandy and Chuck Harris/Flickr hide caption

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Sandy and Chuck Harris/Flickr
Kai Schreiber/Flickr

Food For Thought: The Subtle Forces That Affect Your Appetite

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Rwanda is known as "le pays des milles collines" €-- the land of a thousand hills. Weather varies by altitude; for farmers, detailed forecasts can make a huge difference. Francesco Fiondella/International Research Institute for Climate and Society hide caption

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Francesco Fiondella/International Research Institute for Climate and Society

Turns Out You Do Need A Weatherman To Know Which Way The Wind Blew

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Scientists say bumblebees can sense flowers' electric fields through the bees' fuzzy hairs. Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

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Jens Meyer/AP

Bumblebees' Little Hairs Can Sense Flowers' Electric Fields

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A contractor prepares to cut off the top of a coal bed methane well near Gillette, Wyo., in 2015. It's one of thousands of abandoned, plugged wells sprinkled throughout Wyoming and Colorado. Stephanie Joyce/Wyoming Public Media hide caption

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Stephanie Joyce/Wyoming Public Media

Danger Below? New Properties Hide Abandoned Oil And Gas Wells

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U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz takes part in a press conference at the end of the 2015 meeting of the International Energy Agency Governing Board on Nov. 18, 2015 in Paris. ERIC PIERMONT/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ERIC PIERMONT/AFP/Getty Images

Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz Says Government Can Help Clean Energy Innovation

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Wrecked By Superstorm Sandy, Conservationists Work To Restore Migratory Birds' Refuge

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A chalkboard "bucket list" stirred imaginations and got people talking at an Indianapolis festival designed to help make conversations about death easier. Jake Harper/WFYI hide caption

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Jake Harper/WFYI

Death Talk Is Cool At This Festival

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Scientists in California are turning to big data to help save the red-legged frog, which is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Gary Kittleson hide caption

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Gary Kittleson

Using Algorithms To Catch The Sounds Of Endangered Frogs

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National Public Radio host, Michel Martin asks a question at the live performance of Martin's show, Going There at Colorado State University Tuesday May 24, 2016. The show was titled, " The Future of Water." V. Richard Haro/Richard Haro Photography hide caption

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V. Richard Haro/Richard Haro Photography

A Conversation About The Future Of Water

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"Danger, Will Robinson!" The danger-sensing abilities of the newly developed robot system far exceed those of the Robot in the classic TV series Lost in Space. Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann Archive