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Campers with Williams syndrome on stage at the Grand Ole Opry performing their original song, "I Love Big," with country artist Chris Young in front of a crowd of thousands. Emily Siner/WPLN hide caption

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Emily Siner/WPLN

Country Music And Brain Research Come Together At Nashville Summer Camp

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Sturgeon fisherman Bill Ford has filled Ceapa's boat, "Sturgeon Queen," with his morning's catch: a few gillnets full of wild, six- to eight-foot long Atlantic sturgeon from the St. John River. Courtesy of Cornel Ceapa hide caption

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Courtesy of Cornel Ceapa

In addition to profound exhaustion that isn't relieved with sleep, the illness now called ME/CFS includes flu-like symptoms, muscle pain, "brain fog" and various other physical symptoms, all of which typically worsen with even minor exertion. Malte Mueller/Getty Images hide caption

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Malte Mueller/Getty Images

A new Florida state law allows parents, and any residents, to challenge the use of textbooks and instructional materials they find objectionable via an independent hearing. Gulfiya Mukhamatdinova/Getty Images hide caption

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Gulfiya Mukhamatdinova/Getty Images

New Florida Law Lets Residents Challenge School Textbooks

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An international team of scientists analyzed data from men around the world and found sperm counts declining in Western countries. Hanna Barczyk for NPR hide caption

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Sperm Counts Plummet In Western Men, Study Finds

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Although consuming cannabis is legal in Colorado and several other states, driving while under the influence of the drug is not. Nick Pedersen/Getty Images hide caption

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Nick Pedersen/Getty Images

Scientists Still Seek A Reliable DUI Test For Marijuana

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Rats and people may rely on "metamemory" in a variety of different ways, scientists say. For a rat, it's likely about knowing whether you remember that predator in the distance; for people, knowing what we don't know helps us navigate social interactions. fotografixx/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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fotografixx/Getty Images/iStockphoto

From Rats To Humans, A Brain Knows When It Can't Remember

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A Newspaperman Looks Back On A 77-Year Career

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In 2006, Al Gore issued a forceful warning about the threat of climate change in An Inconvenient Truth. More than a decade later, he's followed it up with An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power. Jensen Walker/Paramount Pictures hide caption

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Jensen Walker/Paramount Pictures

'An Inconvenient Sequel' Is An Effective, Cautiously Optimistic, 'I Told You So'

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Hurricanes in 2012 and 2003 submerged parking lots and park benches, and flooded businesses along Annapolis' Dock Street. City planners estimate that, given the rise in sea level, by 2100 the flood from a once-in-a-hundred-year storm would be almost twice as high as it would be if such a storm hit today. Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise

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The defensive mucus of the Arion subfuscus slug has inspired materials scientists trying to invent better medical adhesives. Nigel Cattlin/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images hide caption

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Nigel Cattlin/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images

Slug Slime Inspires Scientists To Invent Sticky Surgical Glue

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