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"Probably females are better at accessing olfactory memories, but I don't know why," says Robert Bath, a wine and beverage studies professor at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley. "Maybe men don't pay as much attention?" Maria Fabrizio for NPR hide caption

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

What Do Low Oil Prices Mean For Unconventional Extraction Methods?

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Katrina Sparked Push To Improve Hurricane Forecasting

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Scientists Discover New Disease Caused By Prion Protein

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Detweiler was surprised to learn she wasn't eating enough to fuel her training regimen. As an athlete, doctors and nutritionists say, she needed more food variety and more calories — three snacks daily, as well as bigger meals. Courtesy of Nationwide Children's Hospital hide caption

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Courtesy of Nationwide Children's Hospital

To Thrive, Many Young Female Athletes Need A Lot More Food

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Delegates took their seats during the plenary session at the Bonn climate change conference on March 10, 2014. Negotiations resume this week; by the end of the year, the U.N. hopes to have forged a new global agreement. UNclimatechange/Flickr hide caption

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UNclimatechange/Flickr

How Are U.N. Climate Talks Like A Middle School? Cliques Rule

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President Obama is renaming Alaska's Mount McKinley in an effort to strengthen cooperation between the government and Alaska Native tribes. The peak is returning to its traditional name, Denali. Al Grillo/AP hide caption

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Al Grillo/AP

Two octopuses going at it — or, as marine biologist Peter Godfrey-Smith might put it, engaging in a bit of "ornery" behavior. Peter Godfrey-Smith (CUNY and University of Sydney), David Scheel (Alaska Pacific University), Stefan Linquist (University of Guelph) and Matthew Lawrence. hide caption

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Peter Godfrey-Smith (CUNY and University of Sydney), David Scheel (Alaska Pacific University), Stefan Linquist (University of Guelph) and Matthew Lawrence.

WATCH: Octopuses Appear To Take Up Arms As Submarine Warfare Escalates

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California condors have enormous wingspans. That's fine in the wilderness, but when a bird of this size encounters a power line, the results can be fatal. The San Diego Zoo Safari Park has a program to help train birds to avoid the hazard. Jon Myatt/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr hide caption

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Jon Myatt/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr

Small Shocks Help Enormous Birds Learn To Avoid Power Lines

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A View On Oliver Sacks, From A Longtime Friend And Colleague

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Neurologist Dr. Oliver Sacks speaks at Columbia University in June 2009 in New York City. Sacks, a prolific author and commentator, has died at age 82. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris McGrath/Getty Images

Professor Douglas Causey logs information as he tags and takes basic measurements of the birds he harvested in the Aleutian Islands on June 4. He is looking at the birds' blood and their diet, hoping to find out the ways the ocean is changing as it warms. Bob Hallinen/ADN hide caption

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Bob Hallinen/ADN

In The Stomach Of A Seabird, A Glimpse Of An Ocean Heating Up

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Scientific Findings Often Fail To Be Replicated, Researchers Say

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