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Matt Damon portrays an astronaut who relies on science to survive on a hostile planet. Giles Keyte/EPKTV hide caption

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Giles Keyte/EPKTV

How 'The Martian' Became A Science Love Story

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A surgical team at Sooam Biotech in Seoul, South Korea, injects cloned embryos into the uterus of an anesthetized dog. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

Disgraced Scientist Clones Dogs, And Critics Question His Intent

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Ken (left) and Henry were created using DNA plucked from a skin cell of Melvin, the beloved pet of Paula and Phillip Dupont of Lafayette, La. Edmund D. Fountain for NPR hide caption

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Edmund D. Fountain for NPR

Cloning Your Dog, For A Mere $100,000

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The large British study, begun in 1958, tracked the diet, habits and emotional and physical health of thousands of people from childhood through midlife. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Childhood Stress May Prime Pump For Chronic Disease Later

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The Big-Money Effort To Turn The GOP Greener

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In 1954, Dr. Frederick C. Robbins, then chief of pediatrics and contagious diseases at Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital, was one of three winners of that year's Nobel Prize in medicine. The scientists' work, which led to a vaccine against polio, was performed in human fetal cells. AP hide caption

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AP

Research On Fetal Tissue Draws Renewed Political, Scientific Scrutiny

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Dry conditions in California have limited the amount of pollen and nectar bees can collect. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

Drought Is Driving Beekeepers And Their Hives From California

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A worker pours a bucket of pesticide into a machine to be sprayed on almond trees at Del Bosque Farms Inc. in Firebaugh, Calif., on April 6, 2015. California and Washington already have adopted, through state regulation, many of the rules that the EPA now wants to put in place nationwide. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg/Getty Images

California Cities Face Hidden Downside Of Water Conservation: Lost Revenue

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How Poker Player Annie Duke Used Gender Stereotypes To Win Matches

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For several years, a satellite orbiting Mars has seen streaks flowing from Martian mountains during warm periods on the surface. Scientists have now confirmed that water is involved. NASA/JPL/University of Arizona hide caption

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NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

Scientists Confirm There's Water In The Dark Streaks On Mars

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