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If You Give Sheep Cameras, They'll Help Create Street Maps

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A laptop in the Netherlands was one of hundreds of thousands infected by ransomware in May. The malware reportedly originated with the NSA. Rob Engelaar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rob Engelaar/AFP/Getty Images

A technician examines the mirror on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Scientists at two national laboratories are currently building the components for an enormous digital camera that will capture images from the telescope. Joe McNally/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe McNally/Getty Images

The Largest Digital Camera In The World Takes Shape

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Why Google Home Has Hard Time Recognizing The Smash Hit 'Despacito'

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Protesters take part in the March for Free Internet in Moscow in July. In addition to allegedly interfering with the U.S. election, Russia imposes limits on its own citizens' access to information, the Freedom of the Net report says. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

Ellen Pao sued her former employer, the venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caulfield and Byers, alleging she was discriminated against and sexually harassed. She lost the case but is seen as a leading voice on harassment in Silicon Valley. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Struggling For Investments, Silicon Valley Women Reluctant To Speak Out On Harassment

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Belinda Batten of Oregon State University stands in front of a wave energy generator prototype. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Oceans May Host Next Wave Of Renewable Energy

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The FDA has approved the first drug with "a digital ingestion tracking system." Abilify MyCite is an antipsychotic with an ingestible sensor that transmits data to a patch, which then sends the information to a smartphone app. Proteus Digital Health hide caption

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Proteus Digital Health

How One Man Easily Tricked High-Profile People Online Using False Identities

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Dr. Jerad Gardner (right) and Dr. Pembe Oltulu, a pathologist from Konya, Turkey. They'd connected over Facebook. She flew to Istanbul for a real-life meeting when Gardner had a layover at the airport on a trip to meet a sarcoma patient he'd learned about on the social media platform. Jerad Gardner hide caption

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Jerad Gardner

Apple's Philip Schiller unveiled the Face ID feature in September. Less than a week after the iPhone X was released, a Vietnamese security firm said it had cracked Face ID using a specially made mask. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Security Firm Says Extremely Creepy Mask Cracks iPhone X's Face ID

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The Colorado River wraps around Horseshoe Bend in the in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area in Page, Ariz. on Feb. 11. RHONA WISE/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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RHONA WISE/AFP/Getty Images

Instagram Crowds May Be Ruining Nature

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Roundtable Reactions: The Latest Sexual Harassment Allegations And Apologies

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Self-Driving Cars Aren't Quite Ready For City Streets

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Waymo's Chrysler Pacifica minivan was being tested at Waymo's facility in Atwater, Calif. in October. The company says it's deploying cars without backup drivers. Julia Wang/Waymo via AP hide caption

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Julia Wang/Waymo via AP

The FBI is struggling to access the cellphone of the Texas church shooter, which is reportedly an iPhone, reigniting the debate over encryption. Brandon Chew/NPR hide caption

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Brandon Chew/NPR

Once An Underground Currency, Bitcoin Emerges As 'A New Way To Track Information'

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