Artist and flipbooked.com founder Liza Tudor thumbs through "1st Steps," a flipbook of Nicole Garrens' son Zander's first steps. Tudor sent the flipbook to Garrens' husband, Roy, who's currently incarcerated in Texas. Noel Black for NPR hide caption

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Flipbooks Help Prisoners Stay Connected To Their Loved Ones

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British Airways IT Meltdown Leaves Passengers Stranded

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For Video Soundtracks, Computers Are The New Composers

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A board at Heathrow Airport in London displays a slew of cancellations for British Airways flights on Saturday. An IT systems failure laid waste to flyers' plans at the U.K.'s two major airports over the weekend, and the situation is yet to be completely resolved as of Monday. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The good old reflex hammer (like this Taylor model) might seem like an outdated medical device, but its role in diagnosing disease is still as important as ever. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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U.K.'s Anti-Terrorism Programs Under Scrutiny

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After A Terrorist Attack, Social Media Can Cause More Harm Than Good

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Ke Jie, the world's No. 1 Go player, stares at the board during his second match against AlphaGo in Wuzhen, China, on Thursday. The 19-year-old grandmaster dropped the match in the best-of-three series against Google's artificial intelligence program. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Computer Wins Again In Chinese Game Of Go

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Researchers had participants wear the fitness trackers while walking or running on a treadmill and while riding an exercise bike to determine how well the trackers measured heart rate and energy expenditure. Paul Sakuma/Courtesy of Stanford University School of Medicine hide caption

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Fitness Trackers: Good at Measuring Heart Rate, Not So Good At Measuring Calories

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Spectators watch the world's top-ranked Go player, Ke Jie, square off against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo, during the Future of Go Summit in Wuzhen, China, on Tuesday. The program beat Ke in the first of three planned matches. Peng Peng/AP hide caption

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