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Digital lenders are pulling in all kinds of data, like purchases, SAT scores and public records. TCmake_photo/iStockphoto hide caption

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Will Using Artificial Intelligence To Make Loans Trade One Kind Of Bias For Another?

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Code for America founder and Executive Director Jennifer Pahlka speaks Nov. 10 at The New York Times DealBook Conference at Lincoln Center in New York City. Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for The New York Ti hide caption

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Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for The New York Ti

How Can You Bring Innovation To Government Services? Follow Users

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Congress Votes To Roll Back FCC's Internet Privacy Protections

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The U.S. Has An 'Active Cyber War Underway' To Thwart The North Korean Nuclear Threat

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U.S. Postal Service mail carrier Thomas Russell holds a census form while working his route in 2010. Jason E. Miczek/AP hide caption

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Jason E. Miczek/AP

Run-Up To Census 2020 Raises Concerns Over Security And Politics

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Both chambers of the U.S. Congress have voted to overturn the Federal Communications Commission's privacy rules for Internet service providers. Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images

Tenor Scott Joiner and mezzo-soprano Viktoria Falcone try to find love via Tinder in a still from Connection Lost: The Tinder Opera. YouTube hide caption

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YouTube

'The Tinder Opera' Creators Hope You Swipe Right On Online Opera

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Inside DARPA, The Pentagon Agency Whose Technology Has 'Changed the World'

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Older adults have been excluded from some websites that post jobs, according to Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan. Jonathan McHugh/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Jonathan McHugh/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Older Workers Find Age Discrimination Built Right Into Some Job Websites

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Elon Musk has started a new company called Neuralink, in what's widely seen as a bid to add a symbiotic computer layer to the human brain. Susana Gonzalez/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Susana Gonzalez/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Students at Howard University in Washington, D.C. The historically black university is opening Howard West at Google's headquarters in Mountain View. Howard University hide caption

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Howard University

Google Hopes To Hire More Black Engineers By Bringing Students To Silicon Valley

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Wang Fei, 35, from southwest China's Chongqing region, drove cars for Didi Chuxing, China's main ride-hailing service, from last July until January, when new local rules banned out-of-town cars and drivers, and Didi cut bonuses to drivers. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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In China, As In The U.S., The Fight Over Ride Hailing Is Local

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