Technology Latest technology news and breakthroughs in technology, science, and industry. Download the NPR Technology podcast and Technology RSS feed.

Nurses Patricia Wegener (left) and Susan Davis at Mercy Hospital can monitor the condition of a patient who is miles away via the hospital's technology. But some health insurers and analysts remain skeptical that telemedicine saves money. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Smith/KCUR

Telemedicine Expands, Though Financial Prospects Still Uncertain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/444236446/444660134" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Computer chips are seen on newly-issued credit cards. In an effort to reduce counterfeiting and credit card fraud, more than 200 million payment cards have been issued with embedded computer chips in the U.S. ahead of an Oct. 1 deadline, according to the Smart Card Alliance. Mike Blake/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Blake/Reuters/Landov

No More Swiping: New Credit Cards Designed To Reduce Theft

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/444574979/444660146" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Volkswagen Passat is tested for exhaust emissions, at a Ministry of Transport testing station in London. In the U.S., a 1998 copyright law prevents safety researchers from accessing the software that runs cars. John Stillwell/PA Photos/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
John Stillwell/PA Photos/Landov

Amid VW Scandal, Critics Want Access To Carmakers' Computer Code

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/444520161/444527544" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former U.S. National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden appears live via video during a student organized world affairs conference at the Upper Canada College private high school in Toronto in February. Mark Blinch/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Blinch/Reuters/Landov

Atlanta is earning the nickname Silicon Valley of the South, joining spinoffs Silicon Alley in New York and Silicon Prairie in the Midwest. Greg Williams/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Greg Williams/Flickr

Atlanta Tries To Carve Out A Niche In Tech

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/444191902/444398872" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

India's Prime Minister Urges Indians To Stay In Their Country

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/444236937/444236938" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

How 'Long Overdue' Chip Credit Cards Protect Consumers From Fraud

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/444236944/444236945" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

India's Leader Tours Silicon Valley, Swaps Stories With Facebook's Zuckerburg

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/444092327/444092328" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Indian Prime Minister Takes California, Courted By Tech Industry Titans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/443489312/443489313" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript