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Newlyweds resting on the Pont des Arts in Paris last year. Any hope that the love locks that cling to the famous span over the Seine would last forever will be unromantically dashed by the city council, who plan to dismantle them Monday. Remy de la Mauviniere/AP hide caption

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Remy de la Mauviniere/AP

Fadzai Kundishora (left) can no longer go to school because her family can't afford the fees. She spends days at home with her grandmother Miriam Kundishora, doing chores. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

Why Isn't 14-Year-Old Fadzai In School? Zimbabwe's Education Dilemma

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Carlo Ratti of MIT designed this "supermarket of the future" exhibit. If you move a hand close to a product, a digital display lights up, providing information on origin, nutritional value and carbon footprint. Courtesy of COOP Italia hide caption

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Courtesy of COOP Italia

At World's Fair In Italy, The Future Of Food Is On The Table

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Two men sit inside the chapel at Halden prison in far southeast Norway in this picture taken in 2010. Prisoners here spend 12 hours a day in their cells, compared to many U.S. prisons where inmates spend all but one hour in their cell. STR/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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STR/Reuters/Landov

In Norway, A Prison Built On Second Chances

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Conservationists Warn Hunting, Development Threaten New Species

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Afghan children look on at a refugee camp in Jalalabad on May 3, 2015. Like thousands of Afghan returnees, Neik Mohammad became unwanted in Pakistan after a Taliban massacre at a Peshawar school, forcing him to return home to a life of misery and fear in a squalid refugee settlement. SHAH MARAI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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SHAH MARAI/AFP/Getty Images

Armed Palestinian masked militants push back a crowd of worshippers outside a mosque in Gaza City on August 22, 2014, before executing more than a dozen men for allegedly helping Israel during its six-week assault on the Palestinian enclave. This week, Amnesty International released a report saying that Hamas was responsible for these and other killings. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

Under Cover Of Conflict, Hamas Killed Palestinians, Amnesty Alleges

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Iraqi anti-terrorism forces patrol in central Ramadi, Iraq, on April 18. A month later, the city fell to the self-declared Iraqi State. Ayman Oghanna, a journalist who was embedded with Iraqi Special Forces in the city, says the Special Forces are capable precision fighters — but are being asked to fill the role of an entire military. AP hide caption

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AP

Thousands Who Run, Few Who Fight: A Journalist On Ramadi's Fall

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A photo from March shows Mohammed Soltan being pushed by his father Salah during a court appearance in Cairo, Egypt. Soltan, a dual U.S.-Egyptian citizen, was ordered deported to the U.S. after a prolonged hunger strike protesting his prison conditions. Heba Elkholy/AP hide caption

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Heba Elkholy/AP

Rekha is one of the many caged prostitutes Mary Ellen Mark came to know as she photographed in the red-light district of Mumbai. Courtesy of Mary Ellen Mark Studio and Library hide caption

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Courtesy of Mary Ellen Mark Studio and Library

In this photo from 2014, passengers walk past the Middle East respiratory syndrome quarantine area at Manila's International Airport in the Phillipines. The virus is now raising public concern in South Korea. Aaron Favila/AP hide caption

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Aaron Favila/AP

An aerial view of the Grand Mosque in the holy city of Mecca in October 2014. Muhammad Hamed/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Muhammad Hamed/Reuters/Landov

Mecca Becomes A Mecca For Skyscraper Hotels

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