Tiny Desk Intimate concerts, recorded live at the desk of All Songs Considered host Bob Boilen.
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Wu Man

Watch the world's reigning pipa virtuoso play ancient music from her Chinese homeland in the NPR Music offices. When her fingers start to fly, Wu Man can create scenes of cinematic grandeur or serene, moonlit moments.

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Steve Earle

Earle has lived through the sort of horrors that have launched a million country songs: addiction, affliction, heartbreak, even prison. He wears them in his voice, but what's most appealing about him is the wide-eyed, unmistakable fearlessness with which he goes about his life these days.

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Pokey LaFarge

LaFarge writes and performs original, sometimes traditional music steeped in American blues, country and Western swing from the days when 78s ruled the record player. Watch him perform a short set at the NPR Music offices, with the help of his band The South City Three.

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Mount Kimbie

In the few years that Mount Kimbie has been creating music, the London-based dubstep duo has crossed over to find fans in the U.S. Venturing into the pair's groundbreaking yet accessible soundscapes in this first-ever electronic Tiny Desk Concert, it's easy to see why.

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Otis Taylor

Banjo-playing bluesman Otis Taylor plays trance-inducing music that's often built around a single chord — an approach that allows his songs to go on for as long as 10 or even 15 minutes. Watch Taylor perform his songs.

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Josh Ritter

The gifted singer-songwriter's performance in our offices was the best Valentine's Day gift we could have gotten, short of the immediate cessation of the holiday itself.

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Sierra Leone's Refugee All Stars

Not every Tiny Desk Concert is tailor-made for Friday. When you're mere hours from the weekend, you want something lively to get the blood pumping.

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Nellie McKay

You wouldn't think to call someone audacious who once devoted an entire album to Doris Day songs, but Nellie McKay is. Her bold personality shines through in every project she tackles, including this short set recorded at the NPR Music offices.

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Lizz Wright

In this short but satisfying two-song set at the NPR Music offices, the ever-evolving Wright channels the gospel of her past while remaining coolly understated. It helps, of course, that she's got a subtly crafty band with her.

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Steve Riley And The Mamou Playboys

Steve Riley and his Mamou Playboys make sweet Cajun music together: music steeped in the French heritage of southwestern Louisiana and driven by accordion and fiddle. Watch the Grammy-nominated Cajun band play an upbeat yet bittersweet set from the NPR Music offices.

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Damien Jurado

Jurado has spent the last decade churning out albums of raw, time-worn, authentically graceful music, and he's always possessed a seemingly innate gift for capturing the intricacies of human behavior. Watch him perform his songs in the NPR Music office.

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Local Natives

The L.A.-based indie-rock band plays buoyant, infectious songs that brim with sunny melodies and three-part vocal harmonies.

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Adele

In a stripped-down three-song set at the NPR Music offices, the Grammy-winning U.K. pop star showcases her brilliant voice and seemingly effortless charisma. Watch Adele perform two new songs to go with her ubiquitous hit "Chasing Pavements."

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Turtle Island Quartet

On a dime they can pivot from classical quartet to jazz combo, complete with a rhythm section. Watch the Grammy-winning members of the Turtle Island Quartet swing and groove at the NPR Music offices.

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Esperanza Spalding

The bassist and vocalist conceived of Chamber Music Society as an intimate experience, a close musical exchange between a small group of friends. If it was intimacy she wanted, she got her wish: Performing three songs in the constraints of Bob Boilen's workspace ensures that all of her supporting players were nice and cozy.