Tiny Desk Intimate concerts, recorded live at the desk of All Songs Considered host Bob Boilen.

Father Figure performs a Tiny Desk Concert on February 6, 2013. Lizzie Chen/NPR hide caption

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Father Figures

Brash, zany, brainy, scary and danceable, the New York quintet's music mixes rock and jazz like King Crimson at its fiercest. From the moment the band squeaks its first squawk at the NPR Music offices, it's clear that it's about to conjure up an adventure.

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Omar Sosa & Paolo Fresu

Fresu's work on trumpet and flugelhorn provides a perfect foil for Sosa's introspective intersection of jazz, Afro-Cuban sounds and a chamber-music mentality. In this concert at NPR Music's offices, the duo's quietly energetic performance hangs over the crowd like a soft mist.

Yo La Tengo performs a Tiny Desk Concert in February 2013. Marie McGrory/NPR hide caption

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Yo La Tengo

Yo La Tengo's sound has evolved quite a bit since Georgia Hubley and Ira Kaplan first jammed together in 1984; the feedback has subsided, replaced by a more contemplative vibe.

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Efterklang

Before playing Bob Boilen's desk, the Danish band ransacked the NPR Music offices looking for sound-making material. Trying ideas it's never tried, Efterklang fleshes out its gorgeous sound in unexpected ways.

Martin Hayes and Dennis Cahill perform a Tiny Desk Concert on Feb. 25, 2013. Gabriella Demczuk/NPR hide caption

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Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill

Put aside your notion of Irish music as a bunch of familiar jigs and reels, and just listen. Martin Hayes plays his fiddle with an exquisite touch and tone, as well as a magnificent sense of melody and rhythm that never ceases to astonish. Guitarist Dennis Cahill provides delicate support.

The Lone Bellow performs a Tiny Desk Concert on Feb. 20, 2013. Lizzie Chen/NPR hide caption

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The Lone Bellow

The fast-rising Brooklyn trio sings beautiful, heartfelt, impeccably harmonized folk-pop songs. Zach Williams sings every word with Springsteen intensity — it's the sort of delivery that doesn't seem like it could get more powerful, until it does.

Mary Halvorson performs a Tiny Desk Concert on Dec. 12, 2012. Ryan Smith/NPR hide caption

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Mary Halvorson Quintet

A guitarist with a decidedly non-standard approach to jazz's standard practices, Halvorson balances golden-era hard-bop order and free improvising entropy. At the NPR Music offices, her band strikes comforting tones, but also morphs, rephrases and implodes those ideas.

Night Beds' members perform a Tiny Desk Concert on Feb. 6, 2013. Marie McGrory/for NPR hide caption

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Night Beds

We thought Night Beds' Winston Yellen might perform this set solo — all the better to show off his amazing voice, with maybe just his own guitar as backup. But he opted to go all-in with his full touring band, including lap steel and keys. The result is both lighthearted and deeply affecting.

The xx performs a Tiny Desk Concert on Jan. 29, 2013. Gabriella Demczuk/NPR hide caption

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The xx

Beneath The xx's tightly controlled image-making lays music that's raw and vulnerable; shy, worried tentativeness is wired into a sound that shimmers powerfully, but remains as fragile and delicate as a soap bubble.

Cantus performs a Tiny Desk Concert on Dec. 3, 2012. Ryan Smith/for NPR hide caption

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Cantus

What is it about choral music that hits on such a basic human level? The answer may be found in this performance by Cantus, the male a cappella ensemble from Minnesota, which sings three widely divergent songs from the heart.

Of Montreal performs a Tiny Desk Concert on Dec. 14, 2012. Christopher Parks/NPR hide caption

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Of Montreal

Frontman Kevin Barnes has been working on quiet material, and decided to try it out in the intimate confines of the NPR Music offices. The result is a rarely heard side of a band for whom theatricality has long been a means of expression rather than an end unto itself.

Black Prairie performs a Tiny Desk Concert on Nov. 9, 2012. Ryan Smith/NPR hide caption

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Black Prairie

With three members of The Decemberists, the band lends a snappy, lilting quality to songs of alienation. Hear Black Prairie perform richly layered versions of songs from last year's A Tear in the Eye Is a Wound in the Heart.

Lucius Tiny Desk Concert Lauren Rock/NPR hide caption

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Lucius

The charisma and charm Lucius center, transform good pop songwriting into an endearing performance.

Miguel performs a Tiny Desk Concert. Denise DeBelius/NPR hide caption

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Miguel

Miguel turned up in the NPR Music offices early one morning, after playing a show late the night before. Calm and good-natured, he betrayed no hint that he was nervous about stripping his highly produced hits down to their bones.

The Polyphonic Spree performs a Tiny Desk Concert. Lauren Rock/NPR hide caption

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The Polyphonic Spree

The sprawling assortment of singers, horn players, guitarists and percussionists is the largest band we've ever hosted at the Tiny Desk. But Tim DeLaughter and his group say they're used to playing a game of "human Tetris," and had no problem squeezing behind Bob Boilen's desk for this special holiday performance.