Tiny Desk Intimate concerts, recorded live at the desk of All Songs Considered host Bob Boilen.

Dark Meat

We often joke about how many people we can fit behind Bob Boilen's desk for one of NPR Music's Tiny Desk Concerts. Every month, we seem to push the boundary just a bit farther, as the bands get bigger and louder. But the first real test of our limits came when eight members of Dark Meat showed up to play.

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The Swell Season

For those who can't wait to hear songs from Glen Hansard and Marketa Irglova's follow-up to Once (titled Strict Joy, out Oct. 27), the pair played six new songs before performing the first-ever Tiny Desk Concert encore: a white-knuckle journey through "When Your Mind's Made Up."

Sarah Siskind. Frannie Kelley/NPR hide caption

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Sarah Siskind

In this charming performance at the NPR Music offices, Siskind performs two of the highlights from Say It Louder before closing with a requested "Lovin's for Fools."

Dave Douglas Brass Ecstacy performing a Tiny Desk Concert. Frannie Kelley/NPR hide caption

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Dave Douglas Brass Ecstasy

A lot of talented artists pass by Bob Boilen's desk. But this was the first time that NPR Music was serenaded by a trumpet, trombone, French horn, tuba and truncated drum kit playing a Rufus Wainwright cover (and several clever originals) in rich, soulful polyphony.

Bill Callahan

It's a high compliment to suggest that these three Bill Callahan songs may well implant themselves in your brain, lay eggs and sprout horrifically disturbing dreams at that point when you're banging on the snooze alarm in a state of anguished early-morning half-sleep. Hear and watch Callahan perform at the NPR Music offices.

Julie Doiron

If you see Canadian singer-songwriter Julie Doiron perform live, you'll hear a good deal of distorted guitars and intense drumming. Well, at least when she's not performing at the NPR Music offices. It took her a few takes, but we wound up with a bare, stark and memorable set at the Tiny Desk.

Maria Taylor

It's clear from this Tiny Desk Concert that Maria Taylor has never made a go of it as a busker: In terms of volume, she's closer to a whisper than a scream. But hers is a wonderfully warm presence.

The Avett Brothers performing a Tiny Desk Concert. Frannie Kelley/NPR hide caption

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The Avett Brothers

With all due respect to its terrific albums and kinetic, frenetic live shows, if The Avett Brothers could put on a three-song acoustic concert at every workplace in America, the band would be a world-beating colossus. For proof, listen to this performance in the NPR Music offices.

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Jason Vieaux

The classical guitarist has a wide ranging appetite for music, and plays with a clear, lyrical technique. His diverse set at the desk of All Songs Considered host Bob Boilen mixes the baroque, Argentine dance, West African rhythms and a classic from Spain.

Great Lake Swimmers

Singer Tony Dekker sheds his backing band, Great Lake Swimmers, long enough to perform three of his songs at the desk of All Songs Considered host Bob Boilen.

Benjy Ferree

Ferree is a character with just enough charisma to draw you into his oddball world. While his subject matter is dark, his music often hints at humor, as is evidenced by his Tiny Desk Concert.

Michael Kleinfeld for NPR

Horse Feathers

Sweet-voiced, bearded acoustic guitarists are not a rare commodity in the Pacific Northwest, which has spawned the likes of Fleet Foxes, Blind Pilot and countless others, just in the last few years. Horse Feathers' Justin Ringle may be the gentlest beard-wearer of them all, which made him a perfect candidate to appear in NPR Music's Tiny Desk Concerts series: With a voice that high and soft, the man needs a quiet room.

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Tom Jones

When a publicist for Tom Jones contacted us and said the singer wanted to do a "Big Desk Concert," the thought of Jones' substantial voice filling our office left us laughing — and dying to do it.

Super XX Man

The music of Super XX Man's Scott Garred is often introspective and deeply personal. It's sometimes playful, bittersweet and dreamy, but Garred's songs are always heartfelt and reflective.

Woven Hand

Woven Hand's David Eugene Edwards went solo at Bob Boilen's desk with his mandolin-banjo hybrid, a unique instrument made in 1887 by luthier August Pollman. He performs his fiery Americana.